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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"


1952 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 




3v 




http://www.archive.org/details/psyearbookofcoll1952colu 



But nothing) is 
cian who, 
youth, kno 
body, the 
dies which 
with caufio 
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and pays eq 
the poor. 




than a physi- 

ture from his 

tf the human 

it, the reme- 

rc/'ses his art 

^attention to 



Voltaire 



P.&S. 




Published by 

Fourth Year Class 

Columbia University 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

New York City 







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No physician, in so far as he is a physician, considers his own 
good in what he prescribes, but the good of his patient; for the 
true physician is also a ruler having the human body as a sub- 
ject, and is not a mere money-maker. 

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4 hod been asked in my freshman 
tf'o sum up my post, present and 
L philosophies in len words, it would 
\. ove been foo hard. However, lm 
i that the experience of medical 
H has rather chipped owoy at my 
« re supports, and I, as you, am now 
' fh many problems and few answers 
a believe that had medical school 
f me only a questioning attitude and 
\>ility to live with unanswered ques 
r it would have been a worthwhile 



ICEY FINK 

el 3m Manor, N. Y. 

oimbia, A.B. 



d years' Pathology and 
my favorite subjects, with 

ught herel much lower on 
Ire Don King, George Hy 

Ladd taught me mosf, ond 
thanks Our doss "rebelli 
dependence is what I like 

y attitude which I hope sur 



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erever we land, 
joss my door and 

welcome! 



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visit. 



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15 



icerd 



MUNROE HOWE PROCTOR 
Hartford, Conn. 
Trinity, B.S. 

/ denounce the accusation that recent 
graduates ore less idealistic" about their 
medical futures than they were four years 
before The implication is that we should 
seek a position of influence upon □ large 
segment of the world's population for its 
benefit However, by virtue of personal 
qualities and practical necessity it must 
be the plight of most to attempt to better 
only a tiny microscopic sphere of society 
Although this may be a far -cry from the 
noble works we or our critics envisioned, 
it is nonetheless essentiol 




S. 



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eadurer 



KATHERINE S. LOBACH 
Akron, Ohio 
Smith, A.B. 

long live the patient, the \ustification of 
our existence, who has allowed us to 
expose the workings of his soul and body, 
to experience vicariously his suffering and 
well being, whose birth we hove been 
privileged to attend ond whose death we 
have been forced to watch He deserves 
that we approach him with tenderness, 
forbearance, and humility 



ALBERT MOSHI 
Baghdad, Iraq 
Kenyon, A.B. 



ABOODY 



Although I have deep respect for Psy- 
chiatry, I can't help seeing some truth in 
the following piece supposedly written by 
a patient at the Psychiatric Institute in 
New York: 

"I never get mod; I get hostile. 

I never feel said; I'm depressed. 

If I sew or knit and enjoy it a bit, 

I am not handy . . . I'm merely obsessed. 

"If I'm happy, I must be euphoric; 

If I go to the Stork Club or Rifz, 

And if I have a good time making puns or o rhyn 

I'm a manic, or maybe a schiz. 

"I love you . . . but that's just transference 
With Oedipus rearing his head. 
My breathing asthmatic is psychosomatic, 
A fear of exclaiming: 'Drop dead.' " 









1 




1 Ml *" / 1 
l! 11 




WILLIAM A. ABRUZZI, JR. 
Bronxville, N. Y. 
Virginia, A.B. 

Dedication. To the continued life and 
health of the Association of Internes and 
Medical Students. 

From four years of medical school, along 
with a thorough scientific education, let us 
hope that at least some of our colleagues 
have acquired a sense of the greaf re- 
sponsibility to society which each of us 
assumes in accepting a medical doctorate. 

As American Medicine makes greaf ad- 
vances there remains much to be done in 
the field of medical socio economics. With 
the help of the American physicians I 
fervently hope the future may bring the 
betterment of the economic and educa- 
tional conditions of internes and medical 
students; the improved distribution of the 
finest possible medical care to all our 
people, and the eradication of the social 
cancer of discrimination both in medical 
education and in the administering of 
medical care. 



MONROE E. ALENICK 
Newark, N. J. 
Haverford, A.B., M.S. 

With Apologies to Sir Walter Scott 

"Breathes there a Man?" 
Respires there a med. student with horned-rimmed glasses. 
Who never, ever (?) slept through classes; 
Snoring, this is my own, mine Ivory Towerl 
Whose stomach hath ne'er within him turned, 
When leaving "Gil's" all food he spurned. 
To choke down that of a Mid-West Tower. 

Despite "The Rock" and Bellevue's trap; 
This wretch survived the fourth year "snap," 
And now can frame his new degree — 
Half blind, stoop-shouldered; an M.D.! 



/ 






J 



GEORGE WHITAKER ALLEN 
Milledgeville, Ga. 
Harvard, A.B. 

There once were five and twenty tin 
soldiers, all brothers, for they were off- 
spring of the same old tin spoon 




WILBUR G. AVERY 

Yonkers, N. Y. 

New York University, A.B 

Mankind have a great aversion lo in- 
tellectual labour, but even supposing 
knowledge to be easily attainable, more 
people would be content to be ignorant 
than would take even a little trouble to 
acquire it " 

Samuel Johnson 








~> 




ANNE E. ARMSTRONG 
•w York, N. Y. 
ount Holyoke, A.B. 




JOSEPH JAMES BARLOW 
Maiden, Mass. 
Tufts, B.S. 

Medical training — (he Apogee. 

Leap frog, lug-of-war . . . ol necessity 

No time, no money, no normalcy. 

But the MOLE motures, so why shouldn't we? 



PEDRO ARROYO, JR. 
Santurce, Puerto Rico 
Arkansas, B.S. 



ffl 



JEAN T. BAKER 
New York, N. Y. 
Sarah Lawrence, A.B. 



/ 
/ 




^MIFRED J. ANGENENT 

a, U. S. I. 
Vf llesley, A.B, 

With Apologies to Gilbert (Sir William S.) 
I the very model of a modern clerk at P. and $., 

nformation Cecil-Loeb ond Christopher (and Merck I guess), 
bw the latest research and I quote the recent literature, 
Fr \ Comples Rendus to Journals green and even colours more obscu 
A ut the G.A.S. [I stress) I'm teeming with a lot of focts — 
vv I many cheerful points about the surgery of cataracts, 
nfiort in mailers Cecil-Loeb and Christopher (shh-hushl) Merck 
the very model of a modern P. and S. -trained clerk. 



17 





.* 



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^ 







DAVID L. BENNINGHOFF 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Yale, A.B. 

A summary of Ihe four years: 

The first year was long and arduous. 

The second year was mostly arduous. 

The third year was interesting, but also arduous. 

The fourth year is fun and not so very arduous. 



PAUL BERES 
New York, N. Y. 
Williams, A.B. 

The "LMD" has o sorry plight, 
We think him wrong more often than right. 
In the "Ivory Tower" we spend hours long, 
Proving him right, more often than wrong. 

The poetry's poor, that's not new. 
But let's give the local "Doc" his due. 



FRANK GARY BIVINGS 
San Antonio, Texas 
Princeton, A.B. 

"An airplane was circling the field with 
1500 men aboard asking for landing per- 
mission . ." It is too bad that this does 
not hold true only for Texans 





ROBERT L. BRAGG 
Tallahassee, Fla. 
Florida A. & M., B.S. 
Boston, A.M. 



JOHN M. BOZER 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Harvard, A.B. 

City of cities, greatest of them all, 
Broadway, Central Park, buildings so tall. 
Soul of the Nation whose nine millions work. 
Capital of the world — why that's New Yorkl 

The teeming subways, elbows in the face. 
Unsmiling countenances, effort to keep pace, 
Greenless masonry, pavement for a lawn. 
Ruthless efficiency, and I just a pawn. 

Four good years here and forty years more 
To do things softly and a little bit slower. 
A nice city to visit, a nice place to bum. 
But a still nicer place to live away from. 



N 






LEONARD H. BRANDON, JR 
Jackson, Miss. 
Millsaps, B.S. 

May / fake this opportunity to say ffiof 
I am very proud to be a P and S man 
and that a sounder foundation in medicine 
is not to be found elsewhere My four 
years at P and 5 have been most en/oy 
able, and I am grateful for the splendid 
class of 52 of which I have had the 
honor to be a member Thanks a million, 
P and S and classmates, for having made 
the past four years a very bright and 
memorable part of my life let s see lots 
of each other in the future 



ROBERT E CARLSON 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
Tufts, B.S. 

Tis a long, hard climb 
With scarcely a dime 
To relax and enjoy free time. 
And when we grow old. 
To us it is told. 

There'll be no time (or our dime. 
'Tis a long, hard grind 
To prepare our mind 
For the cares which are thrust upon 
And when we are set 
To retire, not (ret, 
We're gone a la cardiac thrombus 



ELLEN N. CHANIN 
New York, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, A.B. 



WILLIAM J. CHASE 
Mamaroneck, N. Y. 
N. Y. State Teachers, A.B. 
Columbia, A.M. 



BAYARD DELAFIELD CLARKSON 

New York, N. Y. 

Yale 






~: 



rt 



MOLLIE ALLENSWORTH COMINSKY 
San Antonio, Texas 
Columbia, A.B. 

The salad days, are they o'er 

or just beginning? 
It shall not be as now — from the shore, 

but hence into the swimming. 
No longer the lowly, lofty irresponsible 

back row spectator, 
But soon on rounds, at conferences 

to be expected — as commentator 
(Barker, really) — and perhaps someday 

in the laboratory as creator 
And everywhere, and anywhere at 

anytime and place — upon request 
To answer younger student's questions 

to discuss, not because a test 
Has been announced with three weeks 

notice, but because now 
We're in the swimming and we must 

learn and teach and know. 





JOHN D. COWLES 
Orange, Calif. 
Yale, A.B. 

Someone said if would take four years 
to get through medical school and then 
a lifetime to get over if. Obviously, many 
of the things that have been pounded into 
us will soon be valueless. Perhaps we can 
get over these things along with the 
distortions of our years in the "towers." 

On second thought, after four yeors 
there must be some things that ought to 
stick for future use. There can be a few 
principles evolved for future living through 
this training. I can go through a few in 
mind now. My question really is how much 
will they be altered by the time I read this 
again? 




DENTON 


SAYER COX 






Montclair 


N. 


J. 








Yale, B.S. 












Only those 


who 


hove felt 


the force : 


ram 


behind can 


give 


impulse 


to 


those 


who 


come after. . 












Only those have force v 


/ho 


know 


t is 


not theirs un 


ess i 


is given 


to 


others, 


rom 


the living to 


the li 


zing. 








By contact 


with 


those we gain the 


inl- 


pulse to increase 


what is huma 


n in us 


and 


others, and 


make 


that our 


en 


terprise 








After 


fi. 


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GARTH BRYANT DETTINGER 
Pittsfield, Mass. 
Harvard, A.B. 

Four years of medical school were 
tough, buf writing this is even tougher, 
Is it possible to have on original thought 
left" 3 However, I must say that being a 
"Shan Jeer" — ShanJcs Villager that is — was 
really enjoyable, and, despite the second 
year, school too was quite bearable In 
fact, the memory will probably become 
mellow when aged — o process which for 
some of us is not very far away. 



20 



ENNETH L. CROUNSE 
vlbany, N. Y. 
ale, B.S. 

From Albany, N. Y . 14 May fair Drive, 
ingerlands — stop in for chow.) Went to 
allege in New Hoven, interrupted by serv- 
e in the European campaign Since then 
lurse hot been less eventful worked in 
tychiatric Institute part of second and 
ird years here; drove a green car which 
oubled as a truck at class picnics; under- 
ok At Aboody's instruction in the ort of 
ireful driving as a public service 





m 





ROBERT MALCOLM ELLSWORTH 
Kingston, Pa. 
Princeton, A.B. 

Four short years in the wonderful town 
With book and lobs and words all 'round- 
Golf in the afternoon now ond again 
Or o trip to Hardness should it rain. 

Someday the future will be right and rosy 
With gorden bright round cottage cozy. 
All of this on me depends. 
One whose memory a soul can rend 

Someday simply cannot meon never. 
Someday is now, now and forever. 



WALLACE EPSTEIN 

New York, N. Y. 

City College of New York, B.S. 

Time to Return 

At the start of the first year we were 
told of the cultural lag which would over 
take us — little time for music, art f liter a 
lure, and not even enough for boseball 
Looking back it seems they were right I 
wonder if now isn't the time to return 

Together with a wish for health and 
success for my classmates, I wish for time 
and inclination to return to those non- 
medical pursuits which keep our first love- — 
medicine — tree of the tarnish of monotony 



CHARLES LEWIS DOOLITTLE 
Woodmont, Conn. 
American, B.S. 

During my years in medical school I 
sometimes have been somewhat depressed 
by contemplation of work to be done 
(cutting the grass, painting the screens), fi- 
nancial problems (What, more baby food'), 
years before and behind me, etc At these 
times a slogan of my grandfather's has 
frequently given me a boost 
"When the whole dern world seems gone 
to pot 

And business on the bum, 
A two-cent grin ond a lifted chin 

Helps some, my boy, helps some." 



FRANK J. CURRAN 
Indianapolis, Ind 
Notre Dame, B.S. 



I 




Its day begun, the just-born sky was blank, defenseless, bare, 
'Til sun-rays linked o chain therethrough, stirring up the air. 
And binding it to mortal earth. 
Whose vapors rose in jeolous mirth, 
And mode the stillness die. 

The day was years, the fight but short, so fast there was she held. 
And dying into clouds, she wept; her thunder, lightning had not held 
The swiftly rising dusk from earth, 
Which sped to darkness in the hearth 
Can now you see the sky? 



/ 





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MINTON B. EVANS 
San Rafael, Calif. 
California (Berkeley), B.S. 

Beyond but including medicine is the 
problem of the greatest value for the per- 
son. What are the lows' Health and work, 
conflict and creation, pleasure and affec- 
tion are certainly involved. A science of 
living is possible before the solution of 
medical and political problems. 

Politically, World Federation is neces- 
sary and the only answer; but it will take 
education, guts and leadership. Anyway, 
"the flicker of men, moths and the wolf 
on the hill" is soon over and "how splen- 
did meantime was the pageant." 



ROBERT ARTHUR EVANS 
San Mateo, Calif. 
Stanford, A.B. 

During a brief respite at this milestone 
of our journey, we can take comfort from 
the lessons learned along the way. From 
them we can also predict some of the 
furnj of the road that stilt remain before 
us. 

Changing successions of errors and vic- 
tories will constitute the essence of a future 
which will lead us, by paths that ore 
sometimes luminous and at other times 
barely discernible, to goals that today 
seem vogue and distant,- to doubts that 
yesterday were dogmas, to hypotheses that 
perhaps tomorrow will be truths. 



WINTHROP FISH 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
California, A.B. 

The abrupt plunge from softly filtered 
California sunshine to New York's frigid 
blasts must invariably provoke question as 
to what — in this of alternating sleet and 
sweat, of packed multitudes in their crazy 
doily rush nowhere, of booby-trapped side- 
walks, and of soot begrimed collars — just 
what there is thot holds the fond affection 
of so many. Four years apprenticeship 
should provide an inkling, but instead, de- 
parture in sight, leaves me suddenly aware 
of a curious regret. 







JUDITH GEDNEY 
East Orange, N. J. 
Mount Holyoke, A.B. 

When first we came in "forty-eight, 
Alas, I did not know my fate! 
I'd always thought the female equal. 
But listen to this awesome sequel: 

A pie in the face from my pal Bill, 
Of butterscotch cream I got my fill! 
Not to mention Roosen's rifle. 
He found with me he dare not trifle! 

But I've been called a "little flower'' 

By Rene, Knight of this Ivory Tower, 

And when I passed through Plimptons door, 

His lion set up o magnificent roar! 

Now life at med school has been great. 
And I have had a happy fate. 
But after four whole yean at Bard, 
We still find stone steps cold and hard! 

At last I have found on five doyi a week 
For knowledge and gems we equally seek. 
From Monday to Friday we compete for o pea 
But on Saturday night I'm glad I'm a girl! 



22 




)BERT McCREERY FLOWERS 
jlumbus, Ga. 
^vidson, B.S. 

Medico) institutions are Filled with men 

Lo ore devoting their lives to various 

> ids of research Yet, when the time 

■nes 'or them to present their findings 

the student of medicine, many com 

2tely bungle the job by neglecting lo 

miliar ize themselves with the simple 

ndamentals of oublic speaking Certainly 

"s is a well known truism, but one which 

believe the future research men of our 

I iss should recoil to mind when their 

ne comes to teach 




ROBERT FELDMAN 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 



PAUL HOWARD GERST 
New York, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

Columbius in '52 
Behind him loy the Ivory Tower 
Behind him Ihe professors, wise. 
Before him lay this very hour 
A patient sick with fevered eyes. 
The good nurse said: Now entre-nous. 
The patient has a dread disease. 
Brave doctor speakl Whal shall we do'" 
Quick nurse, my Merck Manual, please!" 



WILLIAM STETSON GARCELON 
Arlington, Mass. 
Harvard, A.B. 

My fish do smile and smile. 

And wonder all the while, 

Why I don't play 

With them each day. 

In their accustomed style. 

They swim so gay and free. 

Tis quite a sight to seel 
My life of work 
I start to shirk, 
And dreams envelop me. 
Then thoughts do wonder wide; 
Their range I cannot hide. 
I must confess — 

Tis much less stress 
When you can swim and glide. 




L 




DONALD H. GENT 
Endicott, N. Y. 
Hamilton, A.B. 

At Ihe risk of belaboring a point which 
most of my classmates have often heard 
me speai forth on, I must put forth this 
one last reminder that an education which 
leaves no room tor Cod is as lopsided as 
a medical training which is all medical 
with no surgery or specialties The Chris 
tian faith and teachings have always been 
a steadying influence and were the rock 
upon which this nation was built, and 
which made possible the opportunity tor 
us to become doctors 





PAUL L. GILBERT 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
Tufts, B.S. 




HILLARD JACK HALPRYN 
New York, N. Y. 

Columbia, A.B. 

The student of today opens a textbook 
and takes what he reads there as though 
it had arrived on those pages as a matter 
of course. What an eye-opener it would 
be if we could glimpse, even vaguely, the 
history of the knowledge contained in a 
single sentence chosen at random! Even if 
the sentence dealt with a modern subject, 
Us history would go far back along the 
ages; and we would see a succession of 
the men who brought the knowledge con- 
tained in it into being. They were not 
just names in a history-book of Medicine; 
they were real, live people, like us; diverse 
in many ways, like us; but nearly all united 
in belief in the value of the work they 
were doing. 




MURRAY A. GREENE 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

New York University, A.B. 

These past four years will always be 
cherished among my memories. They were 
wonderful years, being associated with 
kindly, sincere, enthusiastic "teachers" and 
splendid colleagues. Moreover, two men 
will olways stand out: Dr. Donald King, 
with whom I spent eleven weeks on Pathol- 
ogy, contributed greatly to my basic med- 
ical knowledge IThanks, Don), and Dr. 
Hanger, with whom I spent one month on 
Medicine, who impressed upon me the 
philosophy: to act with both grace and 
force. 








o, 



r * 




ARTHUR PERRY HALL 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
Harvard, A.B. 

influence is sold, trust is betrayed, truth 
and personal integrity are depreciated 
while in our lifetime multitudes have per- 
ished to prevent it. The hope for preven- 
tion lies not on the battlefields but in 
those with the heritage of truth and in- 
tegrity and with the endowment of educa- 
tion to show, not only in their lives but 
in the community and nation, leadership 
based on these principles We enter a 
respected and trusted fraternity with the 
obligation of extending respect and trust 
beyond the confines of medicine, of being 
more fhan good doctors, of giving in pro- 
portion to our gifts. 



VICTOR HERBERT 
New York, N. Y. 
Columbia, B.S. 

Thought for a Young Doctor 
Who's scorned to look with aught but jaundiced eye 
Upon the world beyond his narrow scope. 
Shall one day find his world has passed him by; 
Where none he's offered, shall he find no hope. 

He who fevers solely for self gain; 
Who freods on others to advance hts tot; 
Will be consumed in fires of his brain; 
Living, die and dying, shall live not. 



24 









rOMAS MILLARD HAMILTON 
\mnington, W. Va. 
\A st Virginia, A.B. 



3w'j she goin' 




HERBERT C. HAYNES 
Clarksburg, W. Va. 
Princeton, A.B. 

'MEDICINE, n A stone flung down the 
Bowery to kill o dog in Broadway ." 

The Devil's Dictionary 
Ambrose Bierce 



U 




J.HN S. HEGEMAN 
Smerville, N. J. 
Pnceton, A.B. 

erhaps it is unique that our class con- 
; of a more heterogeneous group than 
graduating medical class of more 
rmal" times Aside from the usual dif- 
ff-nces in background there are real 
repancies in both post experience and 
)nological age that seem now to alter 
perspectives accordingly In the years 
ome it will be interesting to see what 
ci — if any — these discrepancies will 
e upon us 




JOHN FRANCIS HEFFERNAN, JR. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Holy Cross, A.B. 

The pervading sentiment is nostalgia My 
clossmotes were at different times and in 
many ways stimulating, frustrating, amus- 
ing, anger provoking, exemplary but never 
boring Their ambitions are boundless and 
so widely diverse as to defy com pre hen 
sion. Their motivations are unfathomable 
May all their plans come to fruition, may 
life be good to each and may in his own 
way — Tu ne cede malis, sed contra ou 
denror ifo 



SAMUEL LAWRENCE HOCH 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

He who knows not, ond knows nol that he 

knows nol, is a fool, shun him; 
He who knows not, and knows that he 

knows not, is o child, teach him; 
He who knows, and knows not that he 

knows, is asleep, wake htm; 
He who knows, and knows that he knows, 

is wise, follow him. . . . 



25 




DONALD A. HOLUB 
New York, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

Graduation is a peculiar time-, one's 
senior year cynicism has not yet been re- 
placed by the nostalgia of the alumnus. 
I will admit, however, that I'm conscious 
of this as representing the end, at least 
temporarily, of many friendships made 
here at P. & S. Destiny being what It is, 
though, I'm sure that my future profes- 
sional activities (internal medicine, I guess) 
together with conventions and class re- 
unions, will afford a continuous opportunity 
for renewing these friendships — which I 
consider to be the most valuable by-prod- 
uct of the tost four years. 




JOHN A. HOSMER 
Belmont, Mass. 
Amherst, A.B. 




RUFUS JAMES HUMMEL, JR. 
North Plainfield, N. J. 
Columbia 

Did you ever stop to think that perhaps 
if one pondered on all of the people 
around him, particularly concerning their 
actions — and perhaps even one's own — 
that no matter how anemic they became, 
even to the point of near complete ex- 
sangui nation, some people's red blood 
cell count would always be greater than 
their grey cell count — through no intrinsic 
fault of their own? 

In other words. If a cerebral aspiraton 
were done on them, more hamburger 
would be obtained! 






J. ARCHIBALD JACOB, JR. 
Wellsburg, W. Va. 
Haverford, A.B. 

II is with some slight concern 

That I'll soon be a busy intern, 

And utilize that brand of knowledge 

For which I can thank this College. 

Now unto the uncuipecting 

From whom soon III be collecting. 

Oh no! not cash . . . but further know-hov, 

I with all the others go now 

Eagerly flaunting my stethoscope 

Though not quite shiny, bright wilh hope. 




MARCUS M. KEY 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Columbia, A.B. 



V 





RCERT SHERMAN KASSRIEL 
Yokers, N. Y. 
Ca mbia, A.B. 

it an absolute perfection and fir- 
vj divine to know how to enjoy our 
■set lawfully We seek of her conditions 
Lee se we do not understand the use 
if , r own, and go outside of ourselves 
3et se we do not know whof it is like 
-si Yet there is no use our mounting 
n tilts, for on stiffs we must still walk 
zn ur own legs And on the loftiost 
hi ; in the world we are still sitting only 
zn r own rear" 

Montaigne 



OSMOND KANE 
ale, N. Y. 

Mawr, A.B. 






like E. B. While I am nol able, 
e sounds more like bils from Babel, 
if I could write like Ogden Nosh 
have turned the knack to cash. 
>st graciously declined 
', portunity to speok my mind. 

rnment" was the statement I preferred, 
to Honk's bombardment I've deferred. 



PETER KORNFELD 
New York, N. Y. 
Buffalo, A.B. 

Goethe, the last universal man, chose 
Mehr Licht" for his dying words This 
may well serve as a fitting motto for the 
medical profession because the quest for 
new axioms and better methods must never 
cease We should realize that no presently 
mysterious aspect of the protoplasm must 
lie beyond a fervent hope for eventual, 
rational explanation, for medicine's past, 
present and future rest largely on a phys 
ico chemical elucidation of formerly un- 
known occurrences The term status quo 
has no place in any scientist's dictionary 
It only breeds ignorance, unhappmess and 
contempt 




RICHARD JOSEPH KAUFMAN 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Harvard, A.B. 

Christopher Robin 
Had wheezles 
And sneezles 
They bundled him 
Into 
His bed. 

They sent for some doctors 
In sneezles and wheezles 
To tell them what ought to be done." 

(Specialization rears its ugly head) 

"They oil made a note 
Of the state of his throat. 
They asked if he suffered from thirst. 
They asked if the sneezles 
Came after the wheezles, 
Or the first sneezles 
Came first."' (Atchley.) 



H'l 



. Milne 
really o deep thinker.) 




) 



I 



i 




ALLYN PERRY KIDWELL 
New York, N. Y. 
Harvard, A.B. 

At P & $ we have been exposed to the 
finest medical teaching We have also seen 
exploded the myth that the doctor is in 
fallible, and have seen that medicine has 
its shortcomings, unsolved mysteries and 
new frontiers In future years many of 
these problems will be solved little of 
this will occur accidentally, rather it will 
result from painstaking investigation I 
hope that as new concepts arise, we will 
not be blinded by traditional thinking, but 
rather will be open minded and receptive 
as a result of our careful preparation 



27 



<± 





ARNO W. MACHOLDT 
Nyack, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

Loots like we're coming to another fork 
in the road, and for some of us, it's going 
to be a problem to choose the best route 
from here on. This stretch for the past 
four years has been highly profitable, al- 
ways interesting, and generally enjoyable, 
with good companionship and the best of 
guidance. Somehow that horizen ahead 
looks all the more appealing as a result 
of that past experience. A word of grati- 
tude is in order to all who have helped 
along the way, also the best of luck to 
my fellow travelers — moy each attain his 
ultimate goo/.' 



HENRY W. LOURIA, JR. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Colgate, A.B. 

It was hot and close. One could almost 
taste the heat. Visitors from the western 
slope would have said that it was the 
humidity but each of the 322 inhabitants 
of Cripple Creek, Colorado, knew it wasn't 
the humidity; it was the humanity. It was 
common knowledge that Scrofulous Sam 
told Pemphigous Pete that the town was 
too small for both of them. Everyone knew 
that Pemphigous Pete had made a pass at 
Scrofulous Sam's beloved. Porphyria. Sun- 
down was the deadline. 

Suddenly a shot rang out. Pemphigous 
Pete fell to the ground clutching his mid- 
riff. As if from one throat, 322 voices 
roared in unison, "Quick get o/e Doc 
Lour/a, there's been a shootin'. He' s the 
best sawbones this side of Colorado 
Springs'' One of the wiser citizens was 
overheard to say, "Be sure to tell him it's 
a referral, he still thinks he's back East, 
and keep his Mrs out of this. It's no time 
for making link belts." 





HUGH TOWLES McCASUN 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Princeton, A.B. 

There's this to be said 

For the life that we've led. 

And the life we are going to lead. 

It isn't disease, 

But the "birds and the bees" 

That gives us the reason we need. 




LIZ MACKAY 
New Haven, Conn. 
Mount Holyoke, A.B. 

First year — gleeful enthusiasm — cadavers 
— election year — red wine — dark beer — 
countless distractions of New York City. 

Second year — tests, quizzes, and exami- 
nations — our own stethoscope — first brief 
skirmish with flesh and blood patients. 

Third year — grim reality — life on the 
wards — night ond weekend duty — infroduc- 
tion to the psychiatric patient — jusf like 
everybody else 

Fourth year — life in the raw — pediatrics 
— labor room — worldly, professional point 
of view — tussel with electronic menace- — 
Finis. 




HERBERT M. MAGRAM 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Amherst, A.B., A.M. 

"Be good my child and let who will be clever 





JOHN CUTLER O'LOUGHLIN 
Orangeburg, N. Y. 
Harvard, A.B. 

Once there were three kittiei The first 
kitty loved to cotch mice of/ day The 
second kitty loved to sleep in the sun all 
day The third kitty loved to catch dinner 
mice, sleep in the sun, chase leaves, and 
scamper up tall trees One day a hungry 
doggie came The first kitty was too busy 
to hear the bark The second kitty was too 
sleepy to hear the bark The third kitty 
was frightened to hear the bark He 
scampered up the tallest tree 



LVIN MARGOLIUS, JR. 
orfolk, Va. 
irginia, A.B. 

alom, schuss, snow-plow, Cristie 
u may think you're rather shifty. 
II oh, when in the snow you spill, 
id lie there helpless, cold and still, 
aula cracked, mortise split, 
ink of golf — skiing quit! 




JACK THOMAS ORR 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chattanooga, B.S. 

My model clerk! He does 

not work. 
His work he shirks, he 

has Merck's. 
He's unusually "bright," 

especially at night. 
And when he parties and plays, 

he rests days. 



\ 



in 



HAROLD H. ORVIS, JR. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Guilford, B.S. 

The impact of the last four years has 
been a solid one We hove all leorned, 
and changed, some of us possibly in spite 
of ourselves fie. Newton s 1st law, low 
BMRs, I Q s etc I At any rate, the scien- 
tific discipline, the scientific critique, the 
scientific reasoning in short the scientific 
Science of P and S has obeyed (he well 
fcnown laws of osmosis ond / am glad to 
have been one of the at least semi 
permeable intellects of the class of 1952 






HENRY EDWARDS PAYSON 
Norwichtown, Conn . 
Harvard, B.S. 

Adaptability to fortunes of life is the 
virtue of a mind mature enough to be 
honest, responsible and sincere, and strong 
enough to defend its singularity But com 
peti five excellence is still preferred to 
this quality as a qualification for medical 
study So probably most of us do not 
possess the scope and depth the titles 
physician" and "doctor" have implied 
However, I befieve that experiences wifh 
patients can help us to gain tome mo 
tunty, and thus greatly increase our 
chances of happiness 



WILLIAM POLLIN 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Brooklyn, A.B. 





GUSTAVE G. PRINSELL 
Jersey City, N. J. 
Houghton, A.B. 

"But the wisdom that is from above is first pure, 
Then peaceable, gentle, and easy to be intreated, 
Full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality. 
And without hypocrisy.'' James 4:15 




ROCCO RADUAZO 

Concord, N. H. 

New Hampshire, B.S. 

Since being in medical school, I have 
been impressed with a number of things 
among which are the following: the great 
value of preventive medicine, especially 
in pediatrics; the inability, particularly of 
middle aged women, to use leisure time 
for anything other than introspection with 
resultant hypochondriasis; and the grave 
preoccupation of the average American 
with his bowel function. 



WILLEM WESLEY ROOSEN 
New York, N. Y. 
Sarah Lawrence, A.B. 

At the time of near parting, the follow- 
ing gifts are free and entirely in good 
will: 

To Alvin Margolius: A pair of skis. 

To Henry Pa/son: Safely tires. 

To Bill Reed: An F, 8. I. internship. 

To Bi7/ Abruzzi: One hour in a cage with 
Bill Reed. 

To Rosencrantz-. Guildenstem. 

To Judy Gedney: Win Fish. 

To Win Fish: Judy Gedney. 

To Hugh McCaslin: Also Judy Gedney. 

To Gene Speicher and Frank Curran: 
More firecrackers. 

To Don Gent. A smile. 

To Paul Gilbert. Binoculors. 

To Capt. Will Avery: The Flying Enter- 
prise. 

To Tony Smith: A quicker trigger finger. 

To Ellsworth, Orr and Waller: Booze. 

To the Rest Internship. 




WILLIAM B. REED 
Washington, D. C. 
Penn. State, B.S. 

If is my humble opinion that we should 
as doctors realize that we hove obligations 
to our country and God that we must ful- 
fill We should pursue our medical careers 
remembering that as doctors we can play 
an important port in our communities and 
in our nation. Since the future will decide 
most certainly the fate of our country and 
its democracy, we can not complacently 
detach ourselves from the rest of the 
world whether we be medical researchers 
or general practitioners. Let us humbly 
pray to God that we will continue to have 
the blessings of liberty and full oppor 
tunities that our country offers. 








i^V 



^p* 




I 






JACK REYNOLDS 
Englewood, N. J. 
Wesleyan, A.B. 

Words of Nonsense Vaguely Unrela 

to Anything in Particular 
The position — 

of the physician. 
The future — 

of the suture. 
The problem — 

of pablum. 
The datum — 

on the atom 
The sagacity and audacity 
Of the mind's perspicacity 
The limited capacity 
Of science's veracity 
Advice from devotees 
Of good old Hippocrates 
Couched in warm homilies 
Are worth more thon E. K. G.'s 

Vows: To be Osier — 

not socialer 
(Ah, the wisdom 

he had in him) 
To contemplate 

the sed rate 
To ponder on 

the erythron 
And the genetics 

of diabetics 
and emetics 
for tabetics 
who have r 



ERNEST AUGUST REINER 
Tampa, Fla. 
Columbia, A.B. 

Nobody asked me bu' 

I like Jane Rune//, the Gulf Coast of 
Florida, my in-laws, the Giontj, real Dixie 
Land Jazz, blondes, any comic, Ike, my 
wife's cooking, fights on TV. Jersey Joe 
Walcotl, sailing. Dr Kneelond, brunettes, 
blmtzes and cheezecake at Lindy s, H 
Payson, Central Park, Pedro, the G I Bill. 
OB meal tickets, the 4th year, Reynold's 
microscope, red heads, and New York 

/ don't like loud ties, McCarlhyism, 
snow in the city, the Dodgers, rightists, 
coffee, leftists, crosstown traffic, 5th floor 
walk ups, I B M machines, most bus 
drivers, the IRT, my age, riding with Pay 
son, Roosen or Hegeman, 2nd year quizzes, 
my surgery grades, my landlady, and New 
York 



PETER ROBERT SCAGLIONE 

New York, N. Y. 

City College of N. Y., B.S. 

Lines Composed When Reflecting on the Coming Gradu 

Four years have flown and fifty more may fly. 

Before the final line is fast inscribed. 

Yet I know now that all my lime will be 

Immeasurably sweet and fully lived. 

For what can match this proud profession's plan 

Or hope to dim its promise and its dream 1 ' 

Too circumscribed I find the legal clan. 

And other paths ore lit by feeble beam. 

Those grand gestation I days now touched with gold, 

Seem ever briefer as I draw away 

To fix my gaze upon the future mold. 

In whose unknowing midst I'll shape my clay. 
Humonitas, I sweep the Healing Light, 
For I shall tread the way of starch and white! 



I 




ROBERT E. ROUSSEAU 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Tufts, B.S. 

Am grateful for the opportunity to ex- 
press my sincerest gratitude to all my 
classmates for the rich associations with 
them during the four years of medical 
school — occasiona//y instructive, sometimes 
intimate, often whimsical, always a \oy 



© 



J 






A 



STANLEY H. SCHNEIDER 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

With Apologies to the Spirit of Miss Millay 
I am burning my books at both ends 
From Gray and Cecil through May and Shonds 
They will not last the night. 
But, ohl my foes and ahl my friends 
They give o lovely lightl 




FRANK PARSONS SHEPARD 
New York, N. Y. 
Yale, A.B. 

Since I have not had a good idea in 
many years, and especially since I have 
had no experience in writing things of this 
sort, I can only say that I have enjoyed 
my two years with the class of '52 and 
wish all members of it the best of luck 
in the future. 





JACK GERALD SHILLER 
Forest Hills, N. Y. 
North Carolina, A.B. 

"You can only get out of a venture what 
you're willing to put into it" We've all 
heard that. In fact, we've spent the better 
part of four of our better years believing 
it, and living by it. And for what? 

We/I, the answer for me is "a new life." 
It's the hundreds of people I've met and 
hope to re-meet through the years, it's 
the beginning of an insight into my fellow 
man ; in short, it's the chance for a life's 
work which I hope will justify my ex- 
istence. 

Graduation frightens me, but leaves me 
humble and appreciative. Thanks, P. & S.I 





JOSEPH CALVIN SHIPP 
Northport, Ala. 
Alabama, B.S. 

It has been said thai to study the phe- 
nomena of disease without books is to sail 
an uncharted sea, but lo study medicine 
without patients is not to go to sea at all 
Such an introduction has been presented 
during the last four yeors in the non- 
chauvinistic environment of P. & S with 
oui allowing anyone to feel that he Jcnowj 
"something." And it is well to reflect often 
on this admonition of Osier, There is no 
more despicable individual than a physi 
dan who thinks he knows something 






ROBERT SILBERT 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

"Better is a poor and wise child thon 

an old and foolish king, who knoweth 

not how to receive admonition any more." 

Ecclesiastes: 4:13 



32 



' 



\ 





H. GERARD SIEK, JR. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Wesley an University 

These ore not words of advice — merely 
a reminder to those bachelors among vs. 
who may become side tracked on fhe lonj 
academic road into medicine while striving 
for medical achievements and enjoying 
great satisfaction from winning personal 
honors, that the future still holds out for 
them the possibility of someday experienc 
ing the most satisfying of all accomplish 
ments, the ultimote of all thrills — o chance 
lo say, "This is the greatest thing thot has 
ever happened to me — a chifd of my own! 



)CGLAS S. SJOBERG 
.0 Angeles, Calif. 
;3 : ornia, A.B., A.M. 



JAMES WALTER SMITH 

East Liverpool, Ohio 

Western Reserve University, B.S. 

We Doc's in class of '52. 

We have advice for all: 
Stay clear of women, wine and song. 

Or else you're due lo fall. 

For women do derange the mind 

When cuddled up to you; 
That's how they get their rings and furs. 

And your insurance too! 

We have no living proof for you 

That ethanol is bad. 
But we're conducting tests right now 

And their results — Ye Gad 1 

When people sing like old sick cows 

And bellow party song. 
We're sure St. Peter shakes his head 

And adds another wronq 

We've tried to make it clear to you. 

Thus all this blessed fuss. 
Beware of women, wine, and song — 
Else shovel coal with us. 




ELIHU O. SILVERMAN 
Hartford, Conn. 
Harvard, A.B. 

Medicine requires a large expenditure 
of energy, but the results ore not only a 
personal satisfaction and reward, but the 
attainment of a position of competence 
where unquestionable service to society is 
possible In the world of mounting violence 
in which we study and live, we are for 
tunate that we may band our efforts con 
structively towards the amelioration of 
man's ills, rather than be passive by 
slanders in his threatening destruction 



33 





ANTHONY J. SMITH 
Gates Mills, Ohio 
Harvard, A.B. 

Our class has done much during the 
past four years to make medical school a 
pleasonter and more rewording experience 
We've set a precedent in closs parties 
and picnics, we ve succesifu/fy challenged 
the bookstore We've been msfrumento/ in 
improving some of the first and second 
year courses Our fourth year has produced 
the internship matching plan modification, 
the doss notes, and an outstanding year 
book, as well as having its full quota of 
parties Even though we're now graduating, 
I believe that our class unity will continue 
to contribute to both our professional and 
social lives 



s 



1 



ifl 





MOYER EUGENE 
Evansion, III. 
DePauw, A.B. 



SPEICHER 



Golf is a way of life. As one fates his 
stand against the course, he is met with 
the challenge to match its standards. 
Whether or not this is accomplished is a 
measure of mental management, physical 
skill, and personal determination. One 
hopes that when the shadows of night 
draw around him and he joins his friends 
in the club, he may be able to say: "I 
played the game well — and we won." 



W. DUANE TODD 
Medina, Ohio 
Princeton, A.B. 

The end of four years of Medical School 
leaves one with mixed feelings. A sense 
of satisfaction and relief at having com- 
pleted four years of rather strenuous ac- 
tivity is counter -balanced by the fact that 
many pleasant associations are of neces- 
sity ended. Friendships established in 
Medical School have strong roots sown in 
the soil of mutual challenges, which I 
believe will survive, though time and dis- 
tance may greatly separate us. 




ROBERT GIBSON VAN HORNE 

Tucson, Arizona 

U. S. Naval Academy, B.S. 

To my wife, whose devoted understand- 
ing, skillfull management, and willing self- 
denial have made it possible for my pic- 
ture to appear above these words 



JOHN E. ULTMANN 
Long Island City, N. Y. 
Oberlm College 

1st CPMC adm. fourth year med. student 
with CC-. not knowing what will happen, 
6 mos PH noncontrib except habits which 
are compulsive. PH & I not remarkable 
except for chronic attacks of appendicitis 
preceding quizzes. GU occasionally. Emo- 
tional see PI. PI began about 6 mos ago 
when patient was told he would eventuolly 
have to leave med school for the outside 
world. Cold feet, sweaty palms and an in- 
tense feeling of suffocation became appar- 
ent, gradually becoming wo r se over last 
few days Exacerbations are noted with 
mention of IBM. All other sx denied. EH 
vehemently denied. History unreliable os 
pt is uncooperative. Px completely unre- 
markable Impression: Futurophobia, acute. 
(Code £555-544-322-1). 

John E. Ultmann, c.c. 



WILLIAM CHAMBERS WALLER 
Montgomery, Ala. 
Alabama, B.S. 






34 




k 



y 



/ 



JOSEPH PATRICK WHITE 
New York, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

"I know something about these young 
fellows that come home with their heads 
full of science, as they call it, and stick 
up their signs to tell people they know 
how to cure their headaches and stomach 
aches Science is a first-rate piece of furni- 
ture for a man's upper chamber, if he 
has common sense on the ground floor 
Rut if a man hosnt got plenty of good 
common sense, the more science he has the 
wo:ie for his paf.enf If o doctor has 

science without common sense, he treats a 
fever, but not this man s fever If he has 
common sense without science, he treats 
this man's fever without knowing fhe gen 
erol laws that govern all fevers and all 
vital movements 

O W Holmes. 



f* 

™ ** /^f 




LELAND WHITE 
Bangor, Maine 
University of Maine 

/ had intended to tell a ;ofce abou' o 
chicken but I am afraid to pullet' How 
ever, I would like to lake this opportunity 
to clear up a serious misrepresentation 
Some people claim that I don t answer 
my mail, but that s not correct I do an- 
swer my mail they just don 1 understand 
my system When I get a letter I put it in 
a basket marked To be answered Ithere 
fore showing my intention). When the same 
person sends a second letter I put it in a 
bosief marked To be answered soon 
When they send a third letter I answer 
it Therefore, my friends start their First 
letters as follows "This is the third let- 
ter ." Of course, when I get a telegram 
I answer if right away anyone spend- 
ing fwo dollar s for a telegram deserves 
an answer' 



JOHN ANGUS WHELISS 
Rockingham, N. C. 
Davidson, B.S. 






NORMAN S. WIKLER 
New York, N. Y 
Columbia, A.B. 

The next important advancement in 
medical education will be the elimination 
of fhe artificial separation of the so called 

basic sciences and the clinical years 
This can be accomplished by designing a 
program which begins medical education 
with the complete integration of such 
faculties os clinical medicine, physiology 
and biochemistry so that the neglect of 
such phases of medical thinking as patho 
logical physiology and pathological bio 
chemistry can be avoided Only by such a 
method can we achieve scientific medical 
thinking and a rational approach to medi 
cal problems 



-• 




y 



/ 



ROBERT JAY WILDERMAN 
New York, N. Y. 
Columbia, A.B. 

In the last /ears of our academic train- 
ing, much valuable information has been 
heard and many enjoyable hours have 
been spent during little "Chit-Chats" or 
informal gatherings amongst the students, 
members of the house staff and academic 
staff. These meetings have taken place in 
every part of the Medical Center including 
the coffee shops and lounges It is feft 
by many that no more desirable happening 
could occur than a still closer relation- 
ship among student, staff and faculty. 
After the basic courses are put to memory, 
there is no pleasanter way to absorb the 
knowledge and wisdom of others than 
by the "Chit-Chat" technique. 

MARIANNE WOLFF 
New York, N. Y. 
Hunter, A.B. 



! 
I 




DAVID S. WYMAN 
Portland, Maine 
Bowdoin, A.B. 



Why doesn't the fact that everything that goes up must come 

down, apply to elevators, or as the Americans say, lifts? 
You have been standing on the ninth floor waiting to descend to 

the ground floor since Y. K., Jr. taught lub-dup. 
And all you see is elevators going up, up, up. 
And first your impatience, and eventually your curiosity 

grows keen. 
When you see the same elevator going up o dozen times 

without having been down in between. 
Is there a fourth dimension known only to elevator attendants. 
Or do they, when they get to the top, glide across the roof 

to the next building and (here moke their descendence? 
With apologies lo Ogden Nash. 



"The way they do it Uptown" is a re- 
mark heard frequently and one with many 
connotations. The large medical center at 
times casts aspersions on the "LMD," the 
"LCH," etc.; and the teaching approach 
sometimes seems overly academic. There 
is, however, no better source of medical 
criticism and the academic attitude is an 
invaluable foundation which should be 
utilized whenever possible. 



We are sorry . . . 

These pictures were submitted too late to 
be included in the alphabetical listing. 





(V. 



ARTHUR WILLIAM HAELIG 

Chicago, III. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B. 

Among professi on a/i in the Arts, in- 
cluding the healing Arts, there is an under- 
standable resentment of the power that the 
customer, an ignorant outsider, hos over 
the artist. The customer is to be feared, 
belittled and blamed. We frequently hear 
and make the statement that treatment 
failed because the patient came to the 
doctor too late, when the fault lies clearly 
with either the organization or the achieve- 
ments of Medicine. 



RALPH LUDWIG SUECHTING 

Englewood, N. J. 
Amherst, A.B. 

As young physicians we have a tendency 
to become impressed with our position and 
all too often forget that we are but little 
cogs (in the main wheel, of course) that 
keeps the human race ticking. We should 
not forget thot the farmer supplies food, 
the carpenter shelter, and the policeman 
protection, and that these jobs are equally 
vital to mankind. 

Humility, understanding and the quality 
of mercy (which is stromed today) are at- 
tributes we should all carry with us os well 
as our stethoscope and scalpel. 



JOHN B. HILL 
Wesrporr, Conn. 
Wisconsin, B.S. 



J ibwf epof nz evui. 



Kpio Ijmm 



i^ClMlClt 



Cti 



• • • 



iiucianS 



WELL — the battle of the initials has 
been won. We soon trade in our 
lowly c.c.'s for those mucho coveted 
M.D.'s. 'Twas a romp for some, a bore for 
others, and a nightmare for the rest . . . 
but like all other wars, one fortunately is 
finally left with only the more pleasing 
reminiscences as all the mental and phys- 
ical trauma endured these past years is 
happily repressed. 

Remember that first year? The opening 
day exercises by our University President, 
"Ike" Eisenhower . . . yep, we knew him 
when. A real heterogeneous lot we were. 
A typical post-war bunch with veterans and 
draft-bait, young and old, the whiskerless 
and the balding, married and single, guys 
and gals . . . how heterogeneous can you 
get? Had a generous supply of true gen- 
iuses, some pseudos, and a nice contingent 
who quickly learned the whereabouts of 
the nurses' quarters, Roseland, the local 
pubs, the Polo Grounds, and the Yankee 
Stadium. Some of us were well-heeled, 
some married rich gals, others put their 
wives to work, and the rest scratched for 
the green stuff by selling their blood and 
working nights. We came from every part 
of the country and a handful from more 
distant places. 






We were real "corn balls" those first 
days. Remember the relief some of us had 
when we found out we wouldn't be operat- 
ing or riding ambulances right at first? Lots 
of us got off to a head start having had a 
vast amount of pre-med training while 
others had the minimal requirements. 
Things were pretty well evened up by the 
end of the year although many of us 
weren't too happy with those first year 
marks. 'Course Reynolds got an automatic 
A in Histo for building his own microscope. 




No one knew anybody, but we elected 
our officers. Joe Shipp was to lead us 
thru our first 2 years and capably com- 
manded the "Battle of the Bookstore." Joe 
started that thing called a "quick class 
meeting" which was French for "we shall 
now shoot the hell out of an hour." Man, 
we even had class meetings for class meet- 
ings. What a riot those were . . . and still 
are. All of a sudden everyone's a comedian 
or a lawyer. Waller was the "top banana " 
of the rebel forces and always leveled 
the threat of secession. Praise Allah for 
Jack Shiller who usually made a stirring 
summation of the whole chaotic mess at the 
"1 1th hour" and rammed it down our 
throats. Hardly a day passed without a 
class meeting. In addition to the routine 
trivia, most of the meetings those first two 
years had to do with such momentous and 
controversial subjects as whether we should 
have beer or punch at the party, should 
we invite the faculty {How silly can you 
get?), when to blow up the bookstore, 
should lues be included in the Haelig In- 
surance Plan, and last but not least, what 
exam date shall we change next. 



The bookstore was really caught with 

i;ir ophthalmoscopes down land prices up) 

nen the class advised them that we 

ould get it wholesale." The hassle was 

patched up and everyone kissed and 

ide up when the bookstore promised to 

their Hershey bars to a flat five cents. 

Anatomy found us being avoided in 

valors and our best friends did tell us. 

Rijinders. he of the flashing steel, was 

as as on anatomy instructor. Lots of 

newdies" got wise and asked for his 

istance knowing darn well that after he 

lent 10 minutes on their cadaver they 

jld knock off for a week. 

The first year also saw us introduced to 

uro-anatomy and Dr. Riley . . . the man 

ose left hand always knew what his 

ht hond was doing 'cause they were al- 

ys doing the same thing. Betcha he 

jld make a fortune on TV with that act 

. can't forget Dr. Stookey who stalked 

ck and forth feeding on students who 

s sped into the pit. One soon learned not 

ti give him the correct answer (if you 

l=w it), for then he really gave you the 

Isiness. Speaking of Dr. Stookey . . . re- 

r mber the wonderful caricatures by Bob 

( e poor man's Picasso) Carlson displayed 

c our first shindig — "Molly and the Roses'' 

\ n first prize. 

Utter chaos was averted for most of us 

Mt Spring when Tony's notes brought us 

i safely in Biochem. Friends became un- 

i =nd\y over many a miserable physiology 

<periment. Oh what ghastly results — most 

< us decided then and there that at least 

r .earch wasn't our field. The diuresis ex- 

rises on "Kidney Day'' was jolly fun we 

st admit. Never has so much been 

ssed by so few. 



■»■ ■ ■ fa.»i . 






Remember how elated Reed was over 
Truman's election in '48? You never saw so 
many "Dewey-eyed" people in all your life. 
The Bard Hall Young Republican Clubs 
"victory" party on the roof almost ended 
in a mass suicide leap. Bill recovered suf- 
ficiently to win the pie eating contest in a 
breeze at the 1st year picnic while DeGroot 
coasted to victory in the chug-a-lug. Need- 
less to say, the Speicher backers lost their 
shirts. 

It was soon evident who the lecture 
sleepers were, although that's one act we 
all got into. Waller, Haelig, and Payson 
were the champion vertical head bobbers 
while Abruzzi and Hummel were the best 
"leaners." Payson nearly fell into the pit 
one day from 15 rows out, so he moved 
up closer and resided in 2nd row left in the 
future. 




s^ 



The last rows always contained the cross- 
word puzzle operators. Magram, Silbert, 
Waller, and Haelig were all masters. Shep- 
ard joined them in the 3rd year and was 
soon acknowledged as the best. 

The end of the 1st year gave us our only 
summer off, so some of us "did" Europe. 
Cox, Hall, and Payson were joined by 
"Senator" Reed who scared the hell out 
of a few Youth Rallies. Besides informa- 
tion, Reed picked up who knows what and 
returned a sick man, 3 days late for the 
2nd year classes. Bill was drawn and pale, 
a shadow of his former self, weighing in 
at only a mere 210, coffin and all. Jack 
Reynolds |so thin that his eyes are in single 
filel spent a rough summer in Bermuda as 



member of a scientific expedition. It was 
d scientific he never did find out what he 
•as doing (days). As usual, Sjoberg spent 
ie summer drinking coffee and lulling in 
ie California smog. 

We thought the first year had been 
retty trying but that was the "amateur 
ight" compared to the next one. We gotta 
dmit we weren't pushed too fast in Path 
ie first week when all we did was learn 
ow to sharpen our drawing pencils. Guess 
H. P." has stock in Gillette. It wasn't long 
efore Dr. Flynn lowered the boom with 
ie Ochronosis "thing." Such answers he 

ust have gotten. Orr thought it was okra 
oisoning. Path lab. took 9/10 of our time 
nd counted 1 % of our grade (if that). 
ome of us were "privileged" to have an 
udience with the Dean. The quizzes, mid- 
?rms, and finals were 'nigh over-powering, 
hipp proved an able diplomat and suc- 
?eded in getting exam dates changed 

ith great abandon. We changed so darn 
any that a calendar became standard 
quipment. Joe White was always real nice 
uring exams — always gave everyone an 
our head start. Dr. Turner made a grand 
it with a new type of exam called True, 
alse, or Neither. Such laffs. VanDyke and 
•ilman countered with a doll of a True- 
alse thing that left you with a minus score 
ven if you got two-thirds of the answers 
eed made full use of the parisitology lab. 
acilities in a frantic endeavor to discover 
'hat happened in Italy. Dr. Brown proved 
• 3 be an excellent teacher and best of all, 

very funny fellow. 

Herb Magram, the shy one, took over 
~\e duties of M. C.'tng the class parties . . . 
nd good at it too. Of course, he should 
ave been as he's an ex actor — had his 
oot in a cast once (fun-nie). 




"Say anything in 7 5 words or (e 



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EHEBBSiB = 

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Somewhere along the line we had a 
series of lectures called Biostatistics. These 
were designed to make you disbelieve any 
and all data. Mean deviations, standard 
deviation, squared deviation, chance varia- 
tion, chance distribution, and other such 
enchanting terms were thrown at us in such 
an interesting and entertaining fashion that 
we had to move to a larger auditorium to 
hold the crowds. 

Dr. Kneeland, bless him, came to our 
rescue by providing a much needed change 
of pace. His lectures in physical diagnosis 
were a far cry from the monotony and rou- 
tine which otherwise so characterized our 
2nd year. Orchids to you, sir; we love ya. 
Second year Surgery did have its moments 
. . . especially the post-op follow-ups. There 
are easier things to do than taking a dog's 
temperature. 

The second year lectures really kept the 
note takers busy. Halpryn and Wilderman 
haven't missed a word yet. They must have 
kept 3 paper mills running night and day. 
Then there were those who made an at- 
tempt to outline the lecture, but soon be- 
came hopelessly lost and started scrib- 
bling as fast as they could. Others ap- 
peared to be more in command of the 
situation and would occasionally sneak 
pearls into their little black books. Still 
others lit cigarettes, had pen and paper 
available, but never encountered material 
that they considered worthy of noting. 
Others just slept. 



The third year found us with a new class 
Pres-DeGroot carrying the ball the rest of 
the way. We were split up for the first 
time. Which section you got into depended 
on how soon you chose to face Uncle 
Robert. Some chose to get it over with 
quickly and others decided to wait until 
the last part of the year when they would 
be better prepared (fools). We all found 
out that it didn't make any difference — if 
he wanted ya, he got ya. If your answer 
brought back "fiddle-dee-dee" you auto- 
matically handed in your stethoscope. Bar- 
low stirred the metabolism world with his 
new theory of Diabetes. The third year was 
otherwise fairly benign. Surgery was a lot 
of infusions, transfusions, and confusions. 
We spent the time giving cal gluconate 
injections and acquiring varicose veins, 
aching feet, broken backs, and lousy 
grades. Specialties consisted mainly of 
memorizing May's. All of us shed our 
white coats for a spell, donned our Sunday 
best, complete with bow ties and pocket 
handkerchiefs, and presto . . . "boy psy- 
chiatrists." Sam Hoch was seen walking 
down Broadway with a couch on his back. 
Said he was making a house call. They 
gave us our first elective that year. Elec- 
tive — that's French for "where shall I spend 
my vacation?" "J. Edgar" Reed was in 
high gear and prowled the city in true 
"cloak and dagger style" invading the 
very haunts of the "pinkos." 




Pedro and Haynes were all even in the 
stork derby at three apiece. Rocky and 
Barney were close behind. The third year 
closed with a real bang when Willie "the 
Hawk" Roosen hit the Bard Hall lawn, 
calcaneus first, from four flights up in the 
black of night. There's one rumor (roomer 
— get it?) that was in the air . . . and 
speaking of rumors, boy that's all we 
heard. Can guarantee you that's one Atch- 
ley history that didn't get the facts. Willie 
crutched into Group Clinic to start the 
fourth year but rarely made it to the chart 
desk each morning as some kind nurse 
would invariably direct him to the fracture 
clinic. 

The fourth year, as we had hoped, was 
like being a senior in high school again. 
We were farmed out to Bellevue for 2 
months, and another 2 months was spent 
by most of us as substitute interns In various 
hospitals. Only one course required an 
exam . . . Ob-Gyn. Our 10 days and nights 
in the delivery room endowed us with 
qualifications second to no cop or cab 
driver. The complete A.O.A. list was made 
public. Everyone else tied for 19th. 

The big excitement of course had to do 
with internships and for good reason. The 
old "laissez-faire" manner of internshop- 
ping (that's a word?) was scrapped for a 
bucket of bolts called an IBM machine that 
was designed to spew us all over the coun- 
try .. . it didn't take too long to realize 
the bad points, and thanks to DeGroot 
and Katie Lobach a change for the better 
was made. 




=o 




&A 






J^ 




Where are the interns' quarters?' 



Roosen lured Al Margolius into the New 
England hills for a bit of skiing — Al's first 
and last venture. After four lessons. At felt 
confident to try the "big one" so he went 
to the top with Roosen. Poor Al got all 
wrapped up in his work and one leg really 
went to "Pott's." Willie didn't sweeten mat- 
ters a bit when he wrote "Diabetic Diet" 
on the 5West chart. 

The married members of the class had 
increased considerably in number. Start- 
ing with about 15 in the first year, statis- 
tics showed that by graduation about fifty 
would have "lost their heads." 

We all began to really be concerned 
about the future and the decisions we 
would soon have to make. We were all 
pretty much agreed that we were lucky to 
have been P. & S. men and that these were 
four years that truly would never be for- 
gotten . . . lucky to have had Dean Sever- 
inghaus readily available to push or re- 
strain us at the proper times. 

It is with this serious note that we look 
to the future and ask ourselves . . . "will 
Fish and Gedney ever . . . and, how much 
does a Cadillac cost?" 






§ 

President JOHN BRYANT 

Vice-President GARDNER FAY 

Secretary-Treasurer VERA FRENCH 




art of medicine . . . is thus exercised: one physician is con- 
?d fo the study and management of one disease; there are 
if course a great many who practice this art; some attend to 
the disorders of the eyes, others to those of the head, some 
take care of the teeth, others are conversant with all diseases 
of the bowels; whilst many attend to the cure of maladies 
which are less conspicuous. 

Herodotus 





Randall, William Mohler, Ernest Vandeweghe, Julie Schoepf, Fred Whitcomb, Stanley Vickers, Colin 

McCord, Ben Wright, James Neely, Roscoe Stuber. Third row. Grosvenor Potter, Daniel BenninghofT, 

Richard Tobin, Stanley Olicker, Jack Oppenheimer, James Thorpe, Stanley Edelman, James Terry, James 

Ware, Ronald Pfister, William Rollon. 



A Chronicle and a Critique 



ONCE upon a time there was a 
strange and wonderful Class. 
It had 90 boys and 3 girls, 13 hus- 
bands and no wives, 4 daddies (no 
mothers) and 5 babies. These people 
were all suppressed sadists who had 
the common desire to serve society. 



^ V 




Coming together at a glistening ivory 
tower, they submitted themselves to 
the disciplines of Pedagogy. De- 
votedly they pondered the Great 
Thoughts: Central Inhibition, Status 
Thymolymphaticus, and the Rotation 
of the Gut. Doggedly they colored 
the ovarian tumors and studied cures 
for floating flatus. Even in the lap of 
love, they recited differential diag- 
noses. 

Months and years flew swiftly by, 
and a revised census (June '51) 
showed that now they were 63 boys 
and 10 girls, 27 husbands and 3 
wives, 12 daddies, 13 babies, and 
still no mothers. Now at last sadism 
could find expression in the tradi- 
tional practices of the Clinic. Rectal 
and pelvic (and medical) digitaliza- 
tions apprised the lame, the halt and 
the blind of newly acquired aim and 
finesse. The transition from books to 
beds (though it will never be com- 
plete) had begun. The class was 
exultant. 



To mobilize this joy, a few with 
derring-do summered the length and 
breadth of the land. From the banks 
of the Charles to the Golden Gate, 
from Greenland to Pike's Peak, these 
heroes sailed the smallest craft and 
scaled the greatest mountains; and 
they took time off to heal the living 
and to number the dead. At season's 
end, the sun-tanned ones rejoined 
their sweaty city cousins. Once more 
the Ivory Tower vibrated, but now 
with legends from Walter Reed and 
Chicago Presbyterian and the de- 
partment of pediatrics at Mt. Sinai. 
Together again, the class addressed 
itself to the undressing of patients. 

But the class was not really to- 
gether, and it would be so no more: 
the members were removed from 
their own tight little circles, and were 
shuffled into odd inconsistent little 
groups that convened only once a 
day for a noon hour of collective col- 
lapse. Inseparables were torn asun- 
der: McDaniels and Nork, cele- 
brated Tubes, performed their pranks 
apart like Amos and Andy on sepa- 
rate programs. DiJohn and Cowan 




fi'-h'M 



MISSISSIPPI 

a 




parted ways and entered new socie- 
ties. Oppenheimer and Grossman 
were left to crease lonely brows. A 
few, like the Wares and those in 
the Shanks car pool, anticipated this 
threat of division and planned against 
it. And Warner, for the most part, 
had his Artemis. But these were the 
exceptions. 






r 




tf&m 



■int row Joseph Karai, Stanley Emhorn, Gardner Fay, James Golub, Roberta Goldnng. Frederick Duhl, 

Jerome Dickinson, Pierre dcRceder, Seymour Kafechstein, Second row tester Cromer, Arthur Aronoff, 

Rudolph Klore, Carl Barlow, Horlon Johnson, Ax Hill, Jomei Gcarhorl, Jay Goodkind, Robcrl Lecpcr, 

James Miller, John Bryant, Joseph Atpers, 




■vU^-wU^ 




On the Medical Wards, the class 
was introduced to the phenomenon 
of student chairmen or dragons, who 
had been chosen to mediate their 
affairs. These appointments were not 
the culmination of all earthly ambi- 
tion, but for all the bother they en- 
tailed, they also carried a certain 
amount of . . . mmm, prestige. Some 
Major Dragons, like Randall and 




y 



* 







Perno, quietly accomplished their as- 
signment, and brought their little 
monsters without incident through the 
perilous months; while in the fall, 
Pierce Dragon Smith spoke in sten- 
torian cadences that were familiar to 
the class. He now lifted his clarion 
call for this new command, and lo! 
it was different! Still unmistakable, it 
was milder now and modulated, and 
knew better the limits of oratory. 

51 




The winter group on Medicine pre- 
sented a unique feature: an example, 
on the West Service, of a closely 
working team, synchronized for ar- 
rival, performance and departure. 
As one man, six Shankers bade early 
farewell to wives and children, and 
rode in the car of the day to the 
Tower. There they indulged together 
in the playful production of early- 
morning hematomata. Through this 
collusion, the blame for ESR's that 
were, forgotten and not read could 
only be 0.1667 per clinical clerk. 

The class, by handfuls, took a 
Cook's Tour of the Specialties. Here, 
those whose lives had direction gave 
bold assistance to the general group. 
In Psychiatry, Markowitz assumed this 
central role, for to his ripe and subtle 
mind, some months before, dozens 
of muddled souls had come for clin- 
ical counsel. Now conceding to popu- 
lar demand in the class, Joel tossed 
his natural shyness to the wind, and 
volunteered his rich experience con- 
cerning sex and sanity, so that French 
and Plaut and even Aronoff were 
paled. 

The outstanding contributions in 
Neurology were made, of course, by 
veterans in that field, notably Lloyd- 
Jones and Kurke. Lou's preeminence 
was more or less inevitable, for who 
could match the authority of his vest, 
or the modesty implicit in his ques- 
tions? Joanne's neurological triumph 
was in a different sphere, involved 
with her pleasant facility in making 
friends wherever she goes. Anesthesi- 
ology was true love for Julie, whose 
able fingers did not weary keeping 
other people's chins up. Haagensen, 
Harvey and Humphreys, reduced to 
silence, lowered their heads and 
carved on. 

In this year, more and more of the 
class came to devote their leisure 
hours to the frank accumulation of 
wealth. The days of gay camaraderie 
in the Bard Hall dishroom were over; 
a delightful new game called Stab-a- 
Finger now claimed devotees. The 



52 



chance to play at this night sport at- 
tracted many of the unmarried men 
to the bloody banner of Daddy Jim 
Quinn, although some went off to 
play with other city teams. All these 
men received special training: they 
were taught to get up at 3, 4 and 5 
A.M. and smile. In the Blood Bank, 
four husbands — Bryan, Burnham, 
Johnson and Mohler — played Musi- 
cal Chairs for week-end duty vs. Sun- 
day at home. 

The class gave sanctuary to fugi- 
tives fleeing other Citadels of Truth. 
Dick Tobin, a modest fellow of good 
repute and pleasant company (for 
further details see Whitcomb) had 
gone as far as he could at Dartmouth. 
Ax Hill had presumably gone much 
too far at Cincinnati. At least there 
was a growing sentiment in Ohio that 
either Hill or that guitar would have 
to go. Whereupon, in a fit of rage 
he headed East, having packed his 
hip flask, 5 squash racquets, 17 briar 
pipes, a closet of well-cut tweeds, 
and a pair of tartan swimming-trunks 
with tobacco pouch to match. He ar- 
rived in the city close upon the heels 
of a spirited Belgian Casanova who 
yo-yo'd on the brink of decision and 
finally spun off to a lead-lined sanc- 
tuary in Boston. 

The class was still naive, for the 
most part, about its future. And that 
small number of individuals who felt 
positive at this stage of a direction 
in their lives were perhaps the most 
naive of all. In this year of relative 
freedom from supervision, the only 
dependable truth was the elusiveness 
of material: the basic sciences not 
really mastered, the clinical pictures 
so quickly forgotten, and journals pil- 
ing up, month after month, unread. 
In the face of so much indigestion it 
was a hopeful note that the great 
majority of these boys and girls, dad- 
dies, husbands and wives, recognized 
the pitfall of committing their minds 
too early to a decision that was not 
running away. For at least another 
year, the class would stay on the 
fence. 



53 




* *f* 




Artemis and Watner 



Joe and Louise Koras 



Mira and Jim Gearhoit 



1953 STATISTICS 



Number of people in class 

Number of people married 

Married couples 

Number of people married with children 

Number of people married with 1 child 

Number of people married with 2 children 

Total children in class 

Boys 

Girls 
Odds on sex of next child: it's a girl 



1 16 

42 

41 

13 

10 

3 

16 

4 

12 

3/1 



MARITAL LEVELS: 

Residual 

When married No. Celibate Fraction 

Before matriculation 13 116 13/116 

During 1st year 3 103 3/103 

During 2nd year 15 100 15/100 

During 3rd year 17 85 17/85 
Anticipated during 4th year 

at present rate 16.3 68 16.3/68 

Correction for Leap Year 14 51.7 14/51.7 

Predicted fourth year marital level 



% of Class 

1 1.20 

2.92 

15.00 

20.00 

24.34 
27.08 



100.54% 



Rita and Paul Johnson 



Horton Jean, ond Carry Johnson 



Sally, Colly, and George Cahili 








President 
Vice-President 
Secretary -Treasurer 



<X46 





hough a little one, the master-word Work looms large in 
meaning. It is the open sesame to every portal, the great 
equalizer in the world, the true philosopher's stone which 
transmutes all the base metal of humanity into gold. 

Osier 




Term 



^^r- ' 




W < aM 

WW r^ -> w^^H 

■L ■ 


fcjj^^^^^i 


\\ 
1 


1 




LAST year's first year class and this year's second, as well as next year's 
third class are unquestionably the best that ever went through P. & S. 
For the fourth year in '54 the sky's the limit! The fame of this group has 
spread beyond its medical environs to the world at large. It has been 
featured in the current non-fiction best seller, / Was A Meal-Ticket Slave, 
soon to be filmed under the title of Uncle Thorn's Cabin. In addition to this, 
numerous national and local publications have recognized its unique 
supremacy. This scrapbook contains only a few of the outstanding achieve- 
ments for which it is notorious. 




\\l[t\( 



First row, Larry Bug bee. Bill Bernorf, Dick Hays, George Hogle, Peg Gales, Ronee Herrmann, Hope 
Craig, Pal Dalhouse, "Mickey" Goulran, Andy Cucchiarella, Foster Conklin, Tom Bradley. Second row. Al 
Cannon, Gene Goldberg, Berl Bass, Bob Engler, Herb Gould, Don Dallas, Pearce Browning III, Henry 
Holle, John Durfey, Jim Feeley, Hal Hoops, Vinnie Butler. Third row: Nev Grant, Ken Altmon, Burl Cohen, 
Gene Gottfried, Jim Hastings, Dave Barnhouse, Rod Carter, Kevin Hill, Enoch Gordis, Phil Brickner, 
Walt Bonney, Tom Holland, James Hanwoy, "Chuck" Chidsey. 




I 







Firjf row Sam Silipo, Hal Slocker, Glenn Longer, Bill Muir, Arnie Miltelman, Marv Lipmon, Herb Wo hi, 
Sherwin Kevy, Dave Read, Hugh King, Kolie Wood, Roger Jell i fie. Peyton Mead. Second row Don 
Reisfield, Roy Vagelos, Dick Milward, Doree ond Doug Pennoyer, Dick O'Connor, John Jackson, Wall 
Tuchman, lonnie Mac Don a Id, "Bo" Lindsay, Joe Mockie. Bob Pottenger, Jim Rathe. Third row Dove 
Polmer, Bob Salerno, Earl Wheaton, Bill Hoynes, John Lunt, Fred Klipstein, Bob Munsick, Joe McDoniel, 
Jim Taylor, John Ramsdell, Milena Boss, "Bud" O'Neill. 




59 



GOINGS ON 
ABOUT TOWN 



KEW Your 

Keralb ^Tribune 

INDEX 

Classified Ada 

Are you a 97 pound medical weakling? 
You don't have to be! In confidential 
wrapper I will send you my full course 
in dynamic tension. This method can be 
applied while studying, during exams, 
and while asking questions. As an added 
seducement for prompt payment I will 
enclose the Encyclopedia of Sex. 

— Charles Atlas Durfey. 
Tinkle-Tinkle Glassware Co. Our fragil- 
ity is guaranteed. We service the second 
year class at P&S. 

I have obtained a sordid allotment of 
seats for the new show at the Bard-on- 
thc-Haven Burlesque and Ballet Theater. 
In addition to the regular show there will 
be interpolated monologues by that im- 
mortal Thebesian Herb Gould. For tickets 
see me. 

. — H. Gould. 

For Sale: Almost like new. One bawl 
siaonnds machine. Perfect condition. 

— Dr. Rogers. 

Are you broke? Do you need pin money? 
Painless, harmless way of getting that 
extra dough. See my personal representa- 
tive, Joe Schorr. 

— Elvin Kabat. 





Back fence gossip 

Hedda Hopphead: 

Opera News: Opera devotees are 
awaiting with bated breath 
for Rudi Bing's announcement 
of a successor to the lately de- 
parted trio of Pinza, Merril, 
and Melchior. We know of 
only one voice in the universe 
that can sing trio . . . James 
William Hanway. 



This is a problem tor the pathologists. 



; 




4 






BLOCK THAT METAPHOR! 

[From the Herald Tribune] 

"Try to think of polymorphs 
as policemen marching across 
the country with hatchets on 
their shoulders, and you can 
recognize them by the com- 
pany they keep. They're fight- 
ing anarchists who are in- 
filtrating the sewers like trees." 
— H. P. Smith. 





H . ■'-* 




DEPT. OF UTTER, IF BLISSFUL, 
CONFUSION 



UH HUH DEPARTMENT 

\t first there was much classification for classification's 
ake, but eventually it was understood that phenomena 
re related by virtue of common membership in a family 
ree. The etiology is made up of the phenomenon or 
rroup of phenomena which lie at the beginning of the 
amily tree. All other phenomena in the group are related 
o each other by virtue of sequence, in much the same 
vay that cousins are related to each other, or in the way 
hat parents are related to their descendents." 

—Pathology Notes. 




HOW'S THAT AGAIN? DEPARTMENT 

"They overlap because they 
go at the same rate either be- 
cause the concentration of anti- 
bodies was different so that 
they overlap." . . . Elvin Kabat, 
from a lecture on the agar 
confusion technique. 





FfMV 
(First families of Medical CenlerJ 




The honeymoon is over 





The Saturday Review 
of Literature 

HAMM: Diverting bed-time reading 
for insomniacs. Guaranteed. 

ANDERSON: Thrilling plot; superb 
story-line. So exciting you can't 
put it down — if you can hold 
it up. 

NEURO - PATHOLOGY NOTES : 
Compact descript ... all essen- 
tials . . . vital info . . . reads like 
nite-letter . . . infectious style. 

PATHOLOGY NOTES: Profuse, 
profound, prolific. All organs 
covered. Publishers report pocket 
edition will be available next 
year for vital subway reading. 

FRANTZ & HARVEY: Lyrical style, 
lucid prose, epic in scope. Water- 
proof edition available for bath- 
tub reading including pen that 
writes under water for under- 
lining. 

GOODMAN AND GILMAN: No 
review possible at present. New 
edition expected momentarily. 

BELDING: After digesting this you 
may become a vegetarian. Ideal 
for your bathroom shelf. 



62 




THE ANSWER MAN 

1. Question: What's today's date? 
\nswer: I se your discretion. 

2. Question: W ill you please install a 
pencil sharpener next year? 
Answer: No comment. 

3. Question: U hat do you mean by 
"describe" in question four? 
Answer: The same thing we meant 
in question one. two. three and five. 

4. Question: May I leave the room? 
Answer: Dr. Coon will be back in a 
minute. 



'What do you mean you can't see it? 





"Dr. Coon will answer all questic 
during this examination" 





THE NEVUS 
Now here is a quaint pathological figment 
That's usually marked by deposits of pigment. 
Diagnosis is made with complete satisfaction 
By obtaining a positive Dopa reaction. 
In fact, one might say, if I may ramble on, 
A positive Dopa is sine qua non. 
Though the nevus is one of the melanomata 
It's not a malignant persona non grata. 
The nevus, I think, may be termed on the whole 
As simply a rather benign sort of mole. 



"We were wakened at three o'clock in the morning by 
the unmistakeable sound of a machete banging on the 
door. . . . He entered . . . not five feet tall, and he couldn't 
have weighed more than fifty pounds. His hemoglobin 
was 2.5! ... I sat up the rest of the night poring over 
that stool . . . When I counted 10. 0000 hook-worms 
I quit. 

— H. W. Brown, M.D.: My Life, or The Egg and I. 




There's No Business 



Fogies Brassiere 



Brooks Atkinson: 

I laughed till I retched. 



Life: Boiled Ham with Potted Palms. 



CUE 



Phew. 



Quick: ick! 




MED'S SKIT 
SMASH HIT 
SUCH WIT 
SIDES SPLIT 
PURE GOLD. 



Stella by limelight 



THE NEW YORKER 

Wollcott Gibbs: A potpourri 
of anatomy, obscurity and 
sex. The cast, without ex- 
ception, fulfilled their 
functions with enthusias- 
tic perfection. Highly 
enjoyable if you bring 
your medical dictionary. 



64 




Like SHOW 



a: 



Business 




TIME 



fc. 



fc 7 



<^9 



Look: DON'T DARE! 




At Bard . . . avant garde. 



"Oh, Harry!" 



Newsweek: This is theater? 




PUBLIC NOTICE in 

The Stethoscope 

ATTENTION SECOND YEAR CLASS 
Tonight only: 8 p.m. 

Seminar: conducted by Dr. H. \V. Brown 
(as in jug). 

Title: "Collecting Methods of the Para- 
sitologist." 

Techniques to be discussed : 

1. Bombardier Method (for former 
G. I.'s and adventure seekers).* 

2. Digital Probe Method (old-maid 
schoolteachers, etc.). 

3. Scoop-Flotation Technique (especial- 
ly if low specific gravity obtains). 

4. Partial Restraint Method (meso- 
morphs only!). 

Practice session tomorrow (after break- 
fast). On the whole equipment must be 
provided by the student. ACTH and 
cortisone will be supplied for refractory 
cases. 
^METHOD OF CHOICE. 




Pr< 

Vice-Presiderr 
Secretary -Treasur 




CC&4 



&\ 



^ 







There is no greater sorrow than to recall, in misery, the time 
when we were happy. 

Dante 





Al Masi, Burt Polansky, Peter Rowley, Jack Smith, Bill Schweich, Dan Peltee, Fred Wheelock, Henry 

Rosett, John Mahew, Howard Taylor, Dudley Rochester, Pete Westerhoff, Thorpe Kelley, Don Marcus, 

John Zabriskie, Joe Zawadsky, Don Merriam. 



oLooKurq d5a.ckwa.rcl 



l 9 



LOOSE: not so unduly to bind or con- 
strain or affect, movable, wobbly, un- 
stable, insecure, unbound, unconfined, re- 
laxed, immoral, unconventional. 
September 17, 1951: 




Reassured and repressed, a hundred 
twenty individuals proceeded through the 
mechanics of registration, assumed the 
title of Medical Student . . . and breathed 
a deep sigh of relief for the reward of 
four years of undergrad work (?). 
September 18, P.M.: 

Do you remember Thomas Taunton Sab- 
ine, A.M., M.D.? Neither do we. While 
Dean Severinghaus greeted the First Year 
Class that evening, he stood silently be- 
hind Sevy with his hands folded over his 
black gown staring blankly down from the 
north wall of Bard Hall Lounge. The sage- 
like president of the Second Year Class 
and an envoy from the absent president 
of the P & S Club handed down wisdom 
of ages with the relayed torch, and calcu- 
lated to get us LOOSE with our first P. & S. 
beers. Under the benign influence of the 
foamy brew, young men and women from 
Adams to Zawadsky, from Yale to Alabama 
Polytech, from Ohio to Hawaii and Brook- 
lyn to Baghdad, mixed and met. 

68 




jf row Ray Wunderlich, Bob Eisinger, Dick Bruntletter, leslro Carpe, Felix Ballot, Judy Berg, Norman 
Coberl, Anne Bingham, Ouenlin DeHonn, Marilyn Heins, Andrew Fronlz. Second row. Gurston Goldin, 
Dovid Berman, Jane Heilmann, Bob Bishop, Jim Worcester, Roy Fanoni. Art Gordon, Bob Best, Dick 
Herrmann, Charles Griege, Alan Fcld, Art Verdesca, Poul Adams. Third row Billl Ciaravino, Manuel 
Ochoa, Scot! Halsteod, Jack Griswold, Warren Leads, John Heggie, Tom Anderson, Peter Debevoise, 
Woller DeVault, Paul Redleaf, Bard Cosman, Al Gordon, Don Brown, Dick Elias. 





about 









September 21 : 

Dr. Copenhaver: "Did you hear 
the professor who dreamt that he was lec- 
turing, woke up and found that he was?" 

By now we were used to the 40 silent 
members of our class, and the fact that 
Grant did get greasy in the lab. Albert's 
football pool picked up momentum . . . 
somehow he always won! 
September 28: 

Dr. Rogers stripped the first First Year 
Student . . . for heart sounds (male . . . 
drat!). 
October 7: 

Still tight, rapidly developing lid-drop, 
thanks to Histo. The white cell differential 
counts panicked everyone . . . and ex- 
hausted Dr. Copenhaver's knowledge of 
infectious mononucleosis. 




October 13: 

Well! That didn't help much — our first 
Gross exam. The first plumbings of our 
growing store of medical knowledge 
weren't too reassuring and we awaited a 
whopper next time. Somehow, it seemed 
too simple. 

P.M. To the relief of the Second Year 
Class, we staged our first party. A quiet, 
dignified social event one might have 
called it. Albert was thoroughly puzzled, 
and Mrs. Albert remarked that something 
must be wrong, we weren't a bit like the 
Second Year Class. 
October 16. 

Dr. Noback: "S-C-A-L-P spells scalp." 
And we kept on taking notes. 







A. 



7? 





October 23: 

Dr. Rogers faces Embryology, students 
face Dr. Rogers, face fazes everybody. 
October 24. 

Dr. Detwiler: "Have you heard about the 
professor who dreamt that he was lectur- 
ing, woke up and found that he was?" 

Having muddled through the medulla 
and piddled in the pons, been agonized 
over vast networks of cranial nerves, and 
temporarily interested in the contents of 
the petrous portion of the temporal bone, 
we moved on to hear about weird old 
Anableps anableps, the four-eyed fish. Con- 
nective tissue lay in scattered heaps as the 
great Trigeminal and the mighty Facial 
Nerves fought for control over the facial 
muscles that ran from here to there without 
origins and insertions. 

Having sunk to the heights of scholastic 
endeavor in bringing order out of confu- 
sion, we stumbled toward Thanksgiving. 
November 13: 

We were all delighted, if not excited by 
Dotty Johnson's lectures of the GU System 
. . . the same week as we slid through the 
Digestive System which left us permanently 
traumatized against smooth muscle. 
November 1 4-1 8. 

Tying up the remainder of the head and 
neck with the ribbon muscles, and with a 
terrifying triumvirate of pre-Thanksgiving 
exams drawing close, confidence bolstered 
spasticity as we consolidated our knowl- 
edge. 

November 19,21, 22, 24: 
Gross 
Histology 
Thanksgiving 
Embryology 

(But God! The ax fell.) 

We relaxed from Gross, recovered 
enough to stagger through Histology, and 
reinforced with turkey, plowed through 
Embryology and off to the Yale weekend. 

A new carefree attitude pervaded the 
returned, and looseness was unofficial as 
we muscled in on the back. 

Neuroanatomy may have been a re- 
freshing treat, complete with Dr. Elwyn's 
construction of spinal tracts in the ether, 
but it was laid aside as, Shades of Shake- 
speare and Victor Herbert, we became ac- 
tors and producers! 
December 3. 

With the advent of official looseness and 
the onset of a general state of dissipa- 
tion, a new group spirit developed and a 
hundred-nineteen individuals became a 
class. 

Oh yes, it was the Brachial Plexus that 
we were currently ignoring. Lord Byron 
Stookey was not to be so lightly taken 
although perhaps the new spirit aided a 
better resistance than the last class had 
shown. He said he would, but Dr. Stookey 
gave no quarter . . . our three-fourths was 
sometimes scant, too. 

72 



L 



1 



0* j, ran 



> 



\« 



\ w J 



No cover, no i 




Dr. Copcnhovef 



< 



Ba/once: 500.00 



■ ^ _*' 




lounging 



■■ 






Midnight, December 7: 

Few know, but till the owls went home 
that night, a brave crew painted, cut, 
stapled, sewed and otherwise fabricated 
the blaze of color that burst forth to accom- 
pany the polished talent of midnight re- 
hearsals. 
December 8. 

Startling mimicry (of the faculty), bright 
music, dazzling ballet, suggestive syllables 
of song, gay lights and a spectrum of 
costume color highlighted a joyous farce 
well-received by the spectators. 

From this more or less innocent begin- 
ning, the greatest party Bard Hall had ever 
seen slowly gathered momentum. Intoxi- 
cated by the success of the show, the Class 
of *55 rose to the occasion as Second Year 
men stood in awe. How loose can you get? 

A loyal group in the grill room rapidly 
sank into cerebellar ataxia and prefrontal 
inhibition . . . little else was inhibited, 
however. 

To the tinkling tune of two hundred trip- 
ping tumblers, and a five-piece band, the 
evening rolled onward, gaily — joie de 
vivre. The Class of '55 had proven its social 
virility. 
December ? 0. 

Ever cautious, Dr. Agate suggested that 
although the cubic foot of muscle in the 
human body was theoretically capable of 
lifting sixty tons, for a more conservative 
answer he would divide by three. With 
this, the Class settled down to hibernate 
till Christmas. 







December 1 2. 

Ever-delightful, Dr. Kaplan told us a 
charming fairy tale about the little boat of 
Princess Trapezoid and Prince Trapezium, 
the magic 5 VAN, a big mountain, and lit- 
tle Pisiform, the jealous dwarf. 

The terrifying prospect of oral quizzes 
tn Neuroanatomy turned out pleasantly and 
allowed Neuro to be cast overboard for 
Christmas exam preparations. 

Suddenly and starkly faced with a final 
in Histo, a hundred throats went dry and 
two-hundred eyes went exophthalmic. 
Slides, wet with cold sweat, were passed 
from hand to hand in a terrifyingly swift 
practice practical. The Anatomy Depart- 
ment decided to send us home for Christ- 
mas worry-free, and scheduled an exam 
for the same week. 
December 1 7. 

But we were loose and spent the re- 
mainder of the week merrily and dex- 
trously pulling tendons and uncovering the 
intricacies of the upper appendage. 
December 1 9. 

We cuddled up to our box of slides and 
blew the test to Hell. Fairwell to Histology. 
December 2 1 . 

Well that's that. The Anatomy Depart- 
ment did their bit for a Merry Christmas. 
We decorated, partied, and made ready 
for the Xmas spirit. 
January, ? 952: 

Feeling arrived and already talking 
about welcoming the next year's first year 
class, we find ourselves settling into rou- 
tine, to wear out the year, increasingly 
medical and decreasingly stude'nts. 





The Class of 1952 congratulates the 
Class of 1927 on its 25th Anniversary. We 
would like to thank the following alumni 
for their interest and support in helping us 
make this book possible: 

Edgar M. Bick, M.D. 

Walter F. Duggan, M.D. 

Benjamin D. Erger, M.D. 

G. Leonard Johnson, M.D. 

L. David Lobell, M.D. 

D. Dillon Reidy, M.D. 

John E. Sullivan, M.D. 



WHEN the Class of '27 began their 
medical careers at the "old" P. & S. 
on 59th Street and 10th Avenue in 1923, 
there were about 105 students in class, 
the female contingent making up about a 
tenth of the group. Their curriculum was 
very similar to the present day one and they 
spent their first two years studying the basic 
medical sciences under such masters as Dr. 
Gallaudet, the "Gray" of the period, and 
Dr. Tillney in Neuroanatomy. 

In these "roaring twenties" burning of 
the midnight oil was not only popular, but 
was found to be a necessity by those who 
had hopes of completing their medical edu- 
cation. In those days the lower 1 to 15% 
of the first and second year classes were 
almost automatically replaced by transfer 
students from other schools. 



76 



Twenty-five years ago the short white 
coats bore a mark of distinction, and they 
were only worn on hospital rounds during 
the third and fourth years. Since the school 
was used at that time only for class room 
work, and no facilities were available there 
for clinical teaching, the students journeyed 
to the affiliated hospitals for their clerk- 
ships. These included Presbyterian (which 
was then on the East Side at Madison and 
71st Street), Sloane Hospital and Vander- 
bilt Clinic (which were then adjacent to the 
old P. & S. Building), Bellevue, Monfefiore, 
Metropolitan, and Roosevelt Hospitals. 

In those days there was no Bard Hall and 
the "Knickerbockers," as they were called, 
lived at home or in nearby boarding 
houses. During their first two years our 
twenty-five year men had little time for any 
social life, but as they advanced to the 
third and fourth years their medical studies 
allowed them more time for relaxation and 
the local residences were the scene of many 
social gatherings. They climaxed their med- 
ical school training with a gigantic gradu- 
ation celebration which we hear was one to 
end all parties! 

We've enjoyed reminiscing with the 
twenty-five year men and have found the 
only real difference between then and now 
to be merely a central grouping of all basic 
and clinical facilities "109 city blocks up- 
town." 



( tpnthal mot otit. 



Walter F. Duggan, M.D. 
258 Genesee Street 
Utica 2, N. Y. 

Married since 1927 Member of Staff of 
Department of Physiology at 59th Street 
and 168th Street at intervals between 1924 
and 1937 Practice limited to Ophthalmol- 
ogy since 1931, following a residency at 
the Herman Knapp Memorial Hospital I 
was fortunate to have been Dr. Arnold 
Knapp s assistant from 1 932 until 1 939 
following which I moved from N Y C to 
Utica where I am at present engaged in 
my specialty. Between patients, I have writ 
ten some twenty or more articles, as wel 
as a chapter in Towns Ophthalmology 
Member of the American Ophthalmoiogica 
Society. Member of the Medical and Ad 
visory Committee of the New York State 
Commission for the Blind 









John E. Sullivan, M.D. 
121 East 60th Street 
New York, N. Y. 






Am practicing Surgery. Chief of General 
Surgery at Hospital for Special Surgery. 
Spent four years in the Army I am married 
and have one daughter who graduates 
from Smith College in 1952 



r-£.'cilH<l{oi OtJ t 



>/ 



/* odictiricictii 




I 



G. Leonard Johnson 
390 Booth Avenue 
Englewood, N. J. 

Have been practicing Pediatrics in Engle 
wood since 1930 except for three years 
spent in the Army. Hope to retire to a farm 
near Charlottesville, Va , before / get too 
old to enjoy out-door lite We ore lucky 
to have tour children, two girls and two 
boys None seem interested in becoming 
M.D.'s They see how little leisure the "old 
man" gets 



23 uearj after . 



Benjamin D. Erger, M.D. 
1 1 7 Midwood Street 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 

As the 25th Anniversary of my gradua- 
tion approaches I find myself still scratch- 
ing a living out of the practice of Derma- 
tology 

I am unmarried, at my age it is spelled 
bachelor 

During the recent war I spent four years 
in the Army Medical Corps (highest rank, 
Major) two glorious years of which were 
spent in India (See snapshot ) This, after 
1 6 months as a private in the first World 
War, rounded out my military career. 

My hobbies are book-collecting and one 
other, about which one prefers to remain 
discreet in his utterances. 







Chaos Ex Machina 



AS on every senior medical class, the September pall had begun to 
settle on the fourth year students at P. & S. It was heralded by a 
careless word, a nervous shrug, but inexorably, surely, even the most in- 
sensitive of a group noted for its hair-trigger response to the slightest 
stimulus felt the pervasive sense of impending decision. Soon, now, the 
scramble for internships would begin, every man would temporarily for- 
sake his placid daily routine, put aside his more amiable virtues, and 
search his soul as well as his past record. There was nothing new about 
the pattern. Those who had seen it before smiled knowingly, rightfully 
confident that the uneasiness would pass. 



FOURTH rCAR STUDENT POTS rKJTeRNJ.SU < P APPLICATION 1(0 SLOT (A) 
WHICH U£ADS TO FURNACE (©) ftWD APPUCATIOW is immej)i^rei_v 

eoRueD. H-eftT causes weacup.* to Rise <w p«e&suAe" c«\u&e 

UFTItJCr CftNTjL.e (C) IG-N1TIM& DOCKET (U) VJHICH TA KSS OFF 
AND PUU..S CHAlU Ope'KJlWG' D0&- CA&e (E,). J>0(r C4ASES 

cat (f) vj-uich climbs TRee. Bird (G) pues FRorvx branches 

TMRoutH wiNDOU; AMD 15 SHOT AT X 3V HOAJT&R ()4 ) . 

CoiM- FCipPiwG- HAioU (X), WHICH Auto rv»AncA lcY or>ATCH-es 
STuoeMTS A NJ> HOSPITALS GETS TR£" BIRD WHICH rrtouFS 
LeUfR AMD TURNS ON SWITCH (j) 5TARTIKJ&- FAN (.K). 

lUTeRiOirtip results (L) Afte neatly Su>ujw °u to wexr 

PA&C. 




(A) 









^50\ 





eAse 



»'l4fr 



At first it seemed that they were justified. Through the formless appre- 
hension of the latest group of unwitting candidates, the time-honored 
sequence of lists, conversations with the Dean, applications, interviews, 
and at last, the coveted appointment, became reassuringly apparent. 
Of the decisive factor, the X which could throw all calculations awry, 
realization was to come later. 

It came soothingly, in an orientation talk by the counsellor and class 
__ anchor-man, Dean Severinghaus. . . . "There's a new plan for placing 
students in hospitals this year. Instead of the old chaotic system of in- 
dividual hospitals notifying individual students by phone and wire of 
acceptances on the appointed day, now, after the same preliminaries of 
applications and interviews, the students and hospitals will send in pref- 
erence lists which will bes, matched by an IBM machine. On the first run 
the student's firs,t choice will be matched with the hospital's first choice 
grnup — e Vrthr - -r"i — nrl run the student's first choic e wil l be matched with 
the hospital's second choice group, on the third run the student's second 
choice with the hospital's fiVst. Then second with second choices and so on 
down the line until all possible matches have been made. All hospitals and 
students will be notified of results on March.^T4th. The plan had a trial 
run last year, with good results. Let's go along with it and see how- it 
works . . ." shockingly, in" a telegram J/T . THE SENIOR CLASS Of THB 
MEDtCAL SCHOOL OF THE. OlMIVERSmf/ OF MARYLAND IS 'UNANI- 
MOUSLY OPPOSED TO THE PROPOSED MATCHING PLAN. SUGGEST 



YOU POLL YOUK CLASS FOR OPINION AND LET US HAVE.RESULTS BY 
WIRE IMMEDIATELY . . . / J^ 

Suddenly, what hacLfereenftke clear course of action became confused, 
while what had been'conjuSedly taken, for granted was clearly questioned. 
The seeds of dissent were sown but The~"soil wanted orderly cultivation. 
Once again it had to be demonstrated that common objectives couldjsring, 
diverse and scattered groups to organhfe-^ncT act ^quickly". It was to be 
demonstrated convincingly. After the preliminary flurry of telegrams, the 
exchanges of opinion, the midnight jrieetings, there emerged the-final 
plan: a meeting of delegates from all medical schools was to be held at 
Bard Hall, presided over by Robert Dudley, chairman of the committee 
from Harvard Medical School. Objections to the plan would be considered 
and constructive suggestions for its modification would be presented. 

They came from everywhere — slow-spoken Westerners, fiery South- 
erners, singly and in pairs, angry, conciliatory, questioning, listening to 
objections, voicing their own. They voted to allow reporters, they waited 
an hour for John M. Stalnaker, Director of Operations of the National 
Interassociation Committee on Internships, to come to them from LaGuardia 
Airport and five hours later saw him reluctantly cancel a flight to Wash- 
ington. For seven concentrated, intense hours, they hammered at the 
problem. 

They objected to the manner in which the plan had been presented to 
them, as a fait accomp/is to which they must add the gesture of returning 
by November 15th signed agreements to cooperate with it. The chief 
objection was to the sequence of matching. It was felt that with the order 
given, a man could lose out on his second choice hospital even if it listed 
him as a first choice, because on the second run, those students who had 
that hospital as first choice and who were listed by the hospital as alter- 
nates would get the appointment. Therefore to be safe one would have to 
list as first choice a hospital one was sure of getting, since one could 
easily be passed on one's second and third choices. It was not safe to 
take a flyer. Moreover, instead of preventing the pressure of hospitals for 
prior commitments by students, which had been an evil in the past, the 
confusion and uncertainty on all sides seemed to be fostering such deals. 




Drs. Mullins and Crosby and Mr. Stalnaker of the NICI explained what 
was being attempted with the plan, that was, to improve on the difficulties 
of the old method. They felt that the statistics of matching showed that a 
great majority of students would receive proper placing. 

Tactfully and with skill, the Harvard group presented the most accept- 
able suggestion of the day, a proposal to modify the matching plan in the 
direction of the tested and long successful Boston Pool Plan. Under this 
plan, the matching sequence was far different. It was best explained in 
an example: 

A hypothetical student has five hospitals in choice order A, B, C, D, E. 
Hospital A lists him in its third choice group, B in its second choice group, 
and C, D, and E, in their first choice. He is immediately matched with 
Hospital C and held there tentatively. In the meantime, Hospitals D and E 
are dropped from his list, thus opening up a place for alternates in those 
two hospitals. By the same token, a place may open up for him in Hospital 
B, and he will move up there, his Hospital C also being dropped from his 
list. He may or may not receive a place in A at which he was ranked third 
choice, but in any case he will have been appointed to the highest choice 
hospital he could make, and the hospital has likewise received its most 
preferred applicants in the case that they also desired the hospital. 

Found workable by the representatives of the NICI and the majority 
of delegates alike, the modification was to be considered. The senior 
medical students were to be balloted by mail. Of 4275 who subsequently 
voted, 317 preferred the original matching plan, 2380 the Boston Pool 
modification, 692 the-.method used the year before and 648 no plan at 
all. The NICI was to meet in Chicago and decide whether the modification 
could be adopted. The issue had been met. The outcome waited. 

The time would not be long. A week, two weeks of doubt, and then, 
spreading without fanfare, but jubilantly received, came the work that a 
single telegram had arrived, voicing the acceptance of the modification 
by the NICI. Out of urgency and need, a solution had been found. The 
expected sequence could continue, a peace of sorts would return to the 
harassed fourth year men, a wary truce which would have to satisfy until 
March brought the true climax and decisively resolved it. 





Front row. Oscar Krieqer, Paul Ben 



><> i XXXV^ViWA^ 



SM 



Back 



Walt. 



el Markowitz, Lester Oame 
Richard Herrmann, Harold 



Donald Holub, Paul Gersl, Leon 



Spalter, Stanley Olicker, Stanley 
Vickers, Henry Roselt, Enoch Gordis, Sherwin Kevy, Marvin Lipman. Absent Monroe Alenick, Roberl 
Bragg, Samuel Hoch, Robert Kassriel, George Kleinfeld, Norton Kolomeyer, Nathan Kosovsky, Arthur Like, 
Herbert Poch, Robert Silbersweig, Robert Silbert, Huiyim Schwartz, Marvin Skolnick, Marvin Zimmerman. 



J^hi ^Deltct C^psilc 



Silon 



FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF FRIENDSHIP AND KNOWLEDGE 

Phi Delta Epsilon came into existence in 1 903, and it was but four years 
later that the Columbia P. & S. chapter was founded. The fraternity is 
nationally strong, with 50 chapters in medical schools throughout this 
country and 30 post-graduate clubs. The national enrollment is 11,000, 
of which 1,000 are medical students at the present time. 

Under the capable guidance of Consul Lester Cramer and his officers, 
Phi D. E. has completed a most successful 45th year at P. & S. 

In addition to frequent business meetings, the social sphere has been 
filled with numerous small gatherings held in Bard Hall. These have proved 
to be excellent source for entertainment on lonely Saturday nights, both 
for single and married members. Two inter-chapter dances with members 
of other New York medical schools were held in January and March. 

Academically, Phi Delta Epsilon was also active. Monthly dinner meet- 
ings with various members of the P. & S. staff serving as after-dinner 
speakers brought enlightening information to our members in a very 
pleasant manner. In addition, Dr. Isadore Snapper was guest lecturer at 
the annual Clay Ray Murray Honorary Lectureship; this was the highlight 
of Bard Hall lecture series. 




'.onsul 




LESTER CRAMER 


'ice-Consul 




JOEL MARKOWITZ 


tribe 




SHERWIN KEVY 


reasurer 




STANLEY OLICKER 



an 






iA Surgeons 



V3AR° 



H/^L 



50 



Have" 



\venue 



ISeV 
6800 



York 



32, N- 



osed ot a" 



ir\d 







v 



l< 



■ 




left to Right. James Hastings, Denton Cox, Ben Santoro, 

Arthur Hall, Gardner Fay, Patience Dalhouse, Peter Ways, 

Ronee Herrmann, Katie Wood, Arch Jacob, Judy Gedney, 

evin Hill, Win Fish (Pr esident). 




Uhc dSardd 






Seated Ax Hill, Stanley Einhorn, Lonnie MacDonald, Ben TVIiy^. ilfihd/'ng. John 
Durfey, James Hastings, Daniel Pettee, Ben Santoro, David Barnhouse, James Terry, 
Jay Goodkind, Tony Smith, ^rt Hall IDirectorl, Walter DeVault. Absent: Rod Carter, 
Denton Cox, Allyn Kidwell/WI^Salerno, Tommy Thompson. 



The Bards is a comparatively you 
date back to 1946 when the mixture if f 
to Dwight Morss and seven of his clas 
combination. The combination has s 




in P. & S. history. They 
, wine, and song seemed. 



-J) 

:n immensely desirable yc._ /*y 



as desirable to others 



since, and the sight of a dozen or more mealcal students engaged in somj,-—— 
has become a familiar one on the wards, and at parties and dances arou/d 
the medfcal center. The Bards have also been seen over the past few 
yearsCg> "Wellesley, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, Bryn Mawr, Vassar, and othV 
institulTOlli'Tjf the same delightful nature, with feminine groups dedicate* 
to siji jjar pn ryiples. The renowned triad has thus been fulfilled. The songs 
hav/ not alwoWs been new or original, but tfljie enjoyment with which they 
ha\e beer sunt, and the rewards of BarfcH[ ^Friendships with their fellows, 
ha\nt confrru^i unabated. Further enjoynViiT'has been derived from the 
returr^pTjmany of their fourteen alurflni to vaefous Bard functions. The 




p's been an incomparable 



'cs'h 



Bards thi^fk this is fine. They feel that tHe group 

addition to their lives at P. & S. and/hink that iontinuity with those who 
have gone before will further ensureVthqCpfljejp will in the future shared 
the same delights. They enjoy the pro^pegr^T returning, themselves, \n 
years to come. 





i/Jecirbook ^taP]- 



CO-EDITORS 
Robert E. Carlson James W. Smith 



PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 
M. Jay Goodkind 



ADVERTISING MANAGER 
Jack G. Shiller 



ASSISTANT EDITOR 
Joseph C. Shipp 

SENIOR WRITE-UPS EDITOR 
Henry E. Payson 



LITERARY STAFF ADVERTISING 

Kafherine Lobach, Editor Francis Curran 

Denton Cox Alvin Margolius Peter Scaglione 

Leslie DeGroot Ernest Reiner John Ultmann 

William Garcelon Stanley Schneider SALES 

Arthur Haelig Anthony Smith Allyn Kidwell 

Donald Holub William Waller Judith Gedney 

Arch Jacob Joseph White Richard Kaufmar 

Rosamond Kane The Wymans (Dave and Valerie) Arno Macholdt 



PHOTOGRAPHS 

Winifred Angenent 
Charles Doolittle 
Wallace Epstein 
Sidney Fink 
Victor Herbert 



FIRST YEAR STAFF 

Donald Brown 
Marilyn Heins 
Al Kaplan 
James McCartney 
Robert Siegal 
Joseph Stocks 
Robert Stuckey 
Peter Westerhoff 



SECOND YEAR STAFF 

Thomas Bradley 
Robert Engler 
Eugene Goldberg 
Ronee Herrmann 
Kevin Hill 
Harold Hoops 
Hugh King 
David Palmer 
Kathleen Wood 



THIRD YEAR STAFF 

Joseph Alpers 
Jerry Dickinson 
Gardner Foy 
Ronald Pfister 
James Thorpe 
Benjamin Wright 




c^ 



, r n ^ o r> 

\ \ \ - 

i \ * J J 

•V.i ; 




Seated: Anthony Smith, Robert Evans, Joseph Shipp (President), Marianne Wolff, 
Robert Feldman, Peter Kornfeld. Standing: Leslie DeGroot, Winthrop Fish, John 
Ultmann, Robert Silbert, William Pollin, Donald Holub, Garth Dettinger, Wallace 
Epstein. Absent: George Allen, Paul Gilbert, Stanley Schneider, David Wyman. 



^Afipka VJmecici ^Arlphci 



T 



9' 



V" 



vylrlicerS: 

President JOSEPH SHIPP 

Vice-President ROBERT EVANS 

Secretary STANLEY SCHNEIDER 

Treasurer LESLIE DeGROOT 

Banquet Chairman ROBERT FELDMAN 



ACKNOWLEDGES OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT 

Excelling scholarship, leadership and character constitute the basis for 
membership in this honor medical society which, since its establishment 
in 1902 at the University of Illinois, has expanded to include chapters in 
sixty-two of the countries leading medical institutions. 

The Columbia Chapter, now in its forty-seventh year, has eighteen 
active members. Traditionally the organization's program has consisted of 
a fall lecture and a student symposium in the spring. At the former func- 
tion this year a discussion of renal and hepatic vasotropic factors was 
presented by Dr. Ephraim Shorr of the Cornell Medical Center. Tradition 
was broken later in the year when a panel discussion was given by out- 
standing representatives of general practice, group practice, academic 
medicine, research, and administrative medicine who candidly presented 
the role they are playing in the overall spectrum of medicine. 

89 




First row.- Kent Young, John Jackson, Tom Bradley, Charles Chidsey, Williom Bernart, Daniel Benninghoff, 
William Rotton, Neville Grant, Peter Rowley, Walter DeVault, James Taylor, John Ramsdell. Second row. 
Paul Davidson, Munro Proctor, Duane Todd, John Wilson, Joe McDaniel, Jack Smith, Stanley Einhorn, 
Merrill Bradley, Grosvenor Potter, Walter Riester, Denton Cox, Norman Hill, James Neely, Ronald Pfister. 
Third row-. Jelliffe, Robert Van Home, Richard Eberle, Ben Sanloro, Thorpe Kelly, Donald Reisfield, 
Ben Watkins, Peter Debevoise, George Nesbitt, Ernst Vandeweghe, Dudley Rochester, William Everett, 
Henry Rogers, Peter Western off, James Rathe, Foster Conklin, William Haynes, Lawrence Bug bee, James 
Terry, Andrew Frantz. Fourth row: Scott Halstead, Alan Feld, Richard Pierson, George Selly, William 
Caldwell, Robert Lang man n, Fred Wheelock, Tom Anderson, James Han way, Howard Taylor, James 
Hastings, Philip Baumgartner, David Palmer, Arthur Hall, Henry Payson, Jerome Dickinson, Fred Whitcomb. 
Absent: Fourth Year: George Allen, David Benninghoff, Gary Bivings, William Chase, John Cowles, 
Robert Ellsworth, Win Fish, William Garcelon, Thomas Hamilton, Arch Jacob, Allyn Kidwell, Hugh 
McCaslIn, Rocco Raduazo, William Reed, Frank Shepard, Douglas Sjoberg, Ralph Suechtrng, David Wyman. 
Third Year: George Can ill, Herman Grossman, Paul Keating, Colin McCord, Armistead Nelson, Gary 
Rapmund, Eugene Shekitka, Pierce Smith. Second Year: Edward Angell, Alfred Azzoni, Joseph Bilbao, 
James Garvey, Louis Healey, Thomas Holland, Robert Hollister, Fred Klipslein, Edgar O'Neill, Robert 
Salerno, Harold Stocker, Herbert Swartz, Wynn Westover, Earl Wheaton, Richard Prickett. First Year: 
Dozier Fields, John Griswold, John Heggie, Larry Krotzer, David Massie, James Ranck, Armstead Robinson, 
Charles Tulevech, James Worcester. 



f/u ^lama II h 



9 



OLDEST MEDICAL FRATERNITY AT COLUMBIA 

Nu Sigma Nu had its origin in the convictions of six medical students at 
the University of Michigan, who in 1882 found common cause to bind 
themselves together into a fraternal group. One of these six founders was 
the famous clinician, William Mayo. 

In 1 893 the lota Chapter was installed at P. & S., which was at that time 
located in one of the "toughest" sections of lower Manhattan. Because 
the chapter found it impossible to maintain any sort of housing facilities 
for its members in this area, lota had an initial stormy struggle for exist- 
tence. This however was corrected when P. & S. moved to 59th Street, and 
since then until the present Nu Sigma Nu has continued to grow, until now 
its local chapter enrollment stands at 177 actives, with 83 graduate mem- 
bers on the Medical Center staff. 

Nationally, it is one of the largest medical fraternities, with 1700 stu- 
dent members in 43 chapters, and a total membership of 22,000. 

Locally, the fraternity program is highlighted by the Annual Dawson 
Memorial Lectureship which in recent years has included men such as 
Dr. Alfred Blalock. Socially, all needs are more than filled by the frequent 
informal functions topped by interchapter dances with the Cornell and 
New York University groups. 




President ,., MERR/L1. BRADLEY" 

Wee President GROSVENOR POTTER 

treasurer STANLEY EINHORN 

Secretary ^C FRED KLIPSTEIN 





^*i 



JV 



<*! 




vmnie Butler, John Vecchiolla, Walt Bonney, Len Brandon, Frank Curran, 

Flowers, Mike Garcia, Jim Gearhart, Dick Hays, Hal Hoops, Bill Muir, Frank Newmark, Jack Orr, Doug 
Pennoyer, Art Phinney, Jack Reynolds, Doug Richards, Court Robinson, Will Roosen, Bob Rousseau, Gerry 
Siek, Tony Smith, Jim Smith, Gene Speicher, Hudd Targgart, Tommy Thompson, Jim Wore, Clayton DeHoon, 

Quentin DeHaan. 



PL CL 



PHI CHI LECTURES ARE MEDICAL CENTER FAVORITES 

Phi Chi International, the largest of the medical fraternities, had its be- 
ginning in 1889 with the mergence of local groups at the University of 
Vermont Medical School and the University of Louisville School of Medi 
cine. Throughout its sixty-three years, Phi Chi has shown unparalleled 
growth and development, which can be attributed to the magnetism of 
its ideals and to the benefits which it has consistently provided its student 
and graduate members. Total membership exceeds 35,000 with over 
5,000 collegiate members in fifty-seven active chapters in some thirty 
states and Canada. 

Columbia's Chapter, Upsilon Sigma, was established October 30, 1920. 
It has thrived upon its basic concept of promoting scholarship and fellow- 
ship. The local organization maintains a constructive program of education 
and recreation. Highlighting the monthly dinner lecture series were infor- 
mative, entertaining and provocative talks by Dr. Homer Smith and Dr. 
Russell Cecil. Social functions include frequent informal parties and twice 
yearly interchapter dances with the Cornell, Long Island and New York 
Medical College groups. These same chapters were host to the Phi Chi 
International Convention held in New York City in December of 1951. 




KjfficerS: 

Presiding Senior JAMES SMITH 

Presiding Junior FRANK NEWMARK 

Secretary ... -r... JAMES FEELEY 

Treasurers GARDNER FAY 

RICHARD MILWARD 

r* 
J 

id ■ * A 

[\)L V i 




= 1 





d5ard ^rfaii 



A HOME away from home — a center 
of lower learning — a convent — an 
uptown athletic club. . . . 

Bard Hall has been all of these, and 
more too at times. Most of us have lived 
within its sheltering walls for the last four 
years. I suspect that we are no longer able 
to view it objectively — and may well grow 
nostalgic over it in the years ahead. 

When the Class of '52 arrived in 1948, 
the Cunninghams (My deah!) held sway 
with a mighty hand. After their departure 
to the seas and sands of balmy Florida, 
and with the installation of a new man- 
ager, Mr. Thorns, many changes have come 
aboui, dictated by economic necessity, and 
viewed with alarm by many of us. And 
that is not to say how the first year class 
views the situation. Compulsory dining is 
now an established custom — in fact some 
of the more spastic types in first year are 
already worrying that the program might 
be taken away. We're for it. We think that 
the quite noticeable weight reduction in 
the Class of '55 was definitely called for. 
And don't think that just because they are 
pale and cachectic that they have lost 
their sense of humor. Just the other day 



we heard some of them laughing gayly as 
they fired another volley of glasses through 
the grill-room windows. 

All of you have heard a list of the facili- 
ties available in the Hall, so we shall not 
recite them again. Let us mention a few 
of the highlights. We nave the largest sup- 
ply of ice in New York City. We have a 
night watchman who wards off marauders 
— equipped only with the King James ver- 
sion. We have a whole floor devoted to 
the production of B. O. And we have girls 
— need we say more? 

Personalities, perhaps our greatest asset, 
cannot be passed over quickly. Stella 
triumphs easily in this contest. By dint of 
a pleasant voice, kind phrases, and abso- 
lute control over the meat supply, she has 
endeared herself to literally generations 
of P. and S. men. Unfortunately, she is re- 
tiring at the end of this year, to be re- 
placed, we expect, by one average worker 
and an air-raid siren. 

Bard Hall has been the scene of a few 
spectacles. For instance, on our roof last 
Fourth of July we had the only fireworks 
display in N. Y. C, complete with fire. 
Roosen's Infamous Leap was not just a 
flight of imagination. 

The annual Christmas party and Spring 
Festival each bring a one night stand of 
pomp and circumstance to our daily rou- 
tine, and are complemented by a weekly 
flood of lesser affairs. Roof parties are the 
rage in the summer time, and give us a 
chance to demonstrate our majestic view 
of N. Y. C. to awe-struck outsiders. 





"Ponce 


honey, 


who/' 


j the 


core?" 




£11^1 ■ 












. 




^Tchnowledaemen id 



9* 



Sincerest thanks from the editors . . . 



To all who made this book possible. 

Especially: 
To the parents of the Fourth Year Class for their encouragement and financial aid. 

To Miss Nicola Russell and Mr. Hansel Baugh for their assistance in sales and distribu- 
tion of the book. 

To Miss Jane Howard and Mr. George Wharton of the Public Relations Office for their 
helpful suggestions. 

To Mr. Robert Kelly, Mr. Fred Fuchs, and Mr. George VanSiclen for their excellent co- 
operation and technical advice. 

To Mr. Murray Tarr for his portraits, candids, and group pictures. 

To Mr. M. Jay Goodkind for his exceptional "on the spot" coverage of local events. 

To Mr. Lawrence Heinrich who willingly provided us with photographs of: Medical 
Center from the Hudson, Presbyterian winter scene, Babies Hospital, Neurological 
and the Eye Institute. 

To Dr. Mettler and Mr. Huber for the use of darkroom facilities. 




96 




The 
Pretty Sharp 

Journal of Medicine 

FORMERLY THE WEST 168th ST. RACING NEWS — Established 1H2S 



Circulation — Poor 



V01 1 ME 3 CC. 



JLNE 1. 1952 



M MKEK W A 3-2500 



Tin- Dorlor ami Politics . . 

;;•. Ihruzzi. If. Reed, et .// 0. Pecia 



Diagnosis of Undulanl Fever 

Bruce E. Losis 



793 The WBC and Disease . . 

Luke O'Cyfe and Lew Krrnia 

79-1 The RBC and O, Transport 

Cy O. Xosis and Polly Sythemia 



Treatment of Shoek 797 

Anna Phylaxis and .11 Kalosis 

Common Vitamin Deficiencies . . . 

Barry Berry and Rick Etles 



How Dark Was My trine . . . . 

.// Captonuria, Ollie Gur'ia and .11 Buminuria 

Aleriosclerosis — Symposium . . . 

Monk E. Berg and Ray Saud 



802 
02.5 
303 
905 



What Every Girl Should Know 
Amy Lordosis and Etta Lectasis 

Chemotherapy of Syphilis 

Sal larsan and Penn E. Sillen 

Effects of \ a«ral Stimulation 

Otto Nomic, Bella Donna and Brad E. Cardit 



The Acute Abdomen 993 

Perry Tonitis 



915 
923 
921 

992 



The Doctor ami His Family .... 

Papa Xicolaou 

Entered as four-plus matter at the St. Lues Post Office 



The Hunger Phenomenon 

Anna Rexia 



999 



REMEMBER THIS NAME! 



^rrt 



anaer 



9 { 



Are you caught with vour hepar down ? Is your liver cobble-stoned ? Is vour 
ceph-floc border line? Is your thymol turbidity equivocal ? Does your pro- 
thrombin time drag? If so — then do as thousands are doing. Pep up your 
lazy liver with Dr. Hanger's Little Hepar Pills. They start the flow of our 
most vital digestive juices, and when these juices flow at the rate of 3 pints 
a day — you feel like happy days are here again. Buy at any candy counter 

Special Free Offer 

Mail in 3 box tops and get a Hanger Test free. Mail in 100 and get Dr. 
Hanger. 

ELI LILLIK CANDY COMPANY 



98 



THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 



June 1, 1952 



The subscribers who have bought advertising space on the 
following pages have done so largely to help defray the pub- 
lishing cosfs of this volume. Please hold their names in grateful 
appreciation in the future. 

The Editors 




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NOLAN D. C. LEWIS, M.D., Managing Editor 

70 PINE STREET NEW YORK 5, N. Y. 



THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 



June 1, 1952 



STRAINING 
AT STOOL? 

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the safe way to regularity 

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PRACTICE FOR SALE — Doctor 
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FANTASTIC— BUT TRUE 
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THE LAST RESORT— Under the 
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YOUNG SURGEON— to work with 
Chicago Group. Must be able to care 
for Gunshot wounds and keep his 
mouth shut. 

Have you thought of 

Moving to California? 

WELL DON'T — Cal. Med. Soc. 



IS YOUR PSORIASIS PSORE?— 
How many doctors wear themselves 
out asking silly questions like this of 
their patients? 

Learn /ioiv to take histories 
Enroll A'o-Ti,' — AVou School 

ARE YOU REGULAR?— Join with 
other regular men in Professional 
Men's Literary, Scientific Poker, Chow- 
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LOST — at Med. Soc. Meeting — one 
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WANT TO RETIRE? 

The only way is to invest wisely 
— our magazine can help you. Do 
you know: 

1. Many investors who were hold- 
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2. Many finding all seats on the 
exchange taken have been forced 
to go to the curb? 

3. Oils are beginning to move. 

BUSINESS REVIEW 



WHY PAY TAXES? — This and 
other questions of interest to every 
doctor are answered in our informative 
booklet. 

Bureau of Int. Rev. 

PRESCRIBING IRON? 

What do you do when Rust sets in 
from too much iron. A new Discovery: 
KENDALL'S COMPOUND B (Boiler 
Compound). 

Has Proven Brilliantly Successful. 

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farmers irrigate their fields, not one 
part at a time, but by continuous flow — 
only two tubes needed. Miller- Abbot 
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YOUNG WOMEN WANTED— to 
work under good men — must be able to 
take it eight hours a day. This job is 
different. Address: Box 1144. 

WHAT CIGARETTE DO YOU 
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shows that 98 percent of men who 
switched to Kamels have returned to 
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LEARN TO DRIVE — Beginners 
Classes and Postgraduate Hot-Rod 
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starts soon. 

Henry "Cross Town" Payson 
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OPENING IN LARGE GROUP 
PRACTICE — Need Dignified Morti- 
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We can guarantee steady income — write 
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bring McLaughlin attachments. 



ANNOUNCING! 

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Vol. 5 ec. No. \VA 3-2500 ADVERTISING SECTION 101 



THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 
EXTENDS ITS SINCEREST GOOD WISHES 

TO 
THE SENIOR CLASS 



Compliments 



BARD HALL 



102 



THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 



June 1, 1952 



bthsdt-JUXAq ak&jl izahhjpC... 




__ n investment in 
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investment in consistently 
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DESIGNING AND BUILDING FINE ELECTRO-MEDICAL APPARATUS SINCE 1879 







The Pretty Sharp 

Journal of Medicine 

Copyright, 19>2, by the Ivory Tower Medical Society 



Volume 3 c.c. 



JUNE 1, 1952 



Number WA 3-2500 



I II TV VK-VKS Ol MEDICAL I'KOUiKSS 



I ' niforin 

The efficient coordination of an involved and multi- 
serviced Medical Center has become so complicated 
during the last halt century that the editors of this 
journal have recognized the need for a few explanatory 
remarks on the personnel, their attire, and a few fac- 
tual hints on how to recognize them. 

The Long White Coat: 

Perhaps the trickiest and most misleading uniform, 
this garment has been worn by people ranging from 
Professors of Medicine to Dinars of the Department 
of Neuropathology. Also included in this category arc* 
Attendings, all ranks of Academicians, laboratory as- 
sistants, secretaries, technicians, and an occasional visit- 
ing freshman medical student from N. Y. U. Some 
pointers to be remembered are these: 

a. Memorize the Heads of Departments. 

b. Look for a stethoscope. When you find one, de- 
grees of respect may usually be estimated by other 
factors such as age and type of stethoscope, age and 
degree of dignity of individual concerned, and height 
of hemline of garment above the wearer's knees. (Cuffs 
are usually rolled and therefore unreliable.) It is to 
be noted that the presence of the stethoscope may also 
be unreliable in the case of the Department of Surgery. 

c. Secretaries have pencils in their hair. 

d. Lab workers have stained coats and acid holes. 

The Short I Chile Coat: 

a. // ith white trousers: When white trousers are 
noted: the immediate differential includes interns, resi- 
dents, male nurses, orderlies, and members of the food 
service. The presence of the stethoscope is again in- 
valuable in detecting interns and residents, except in 
the occasional case of an ambitious male nurse. Some- 
times the faint stripe of the orderly's uniform is grossly 
evident; more usually, judgment must be used, con- 
sidering age, degree of alopecia, and presence of rectal 
thermometer in the upper right hand pocket. Residents 
can usually be counted upon to wear bow ties, but an 
occasional intern from Harvard will confuse you. For- 
tunately the Food Service is beginning to label their 
uniforms, but an occasional new intern gets labelled 
also. 

b. // ith civilian trousers: A priori, this category 



Science 

always means the medical student. However, some- 
times it becomes desirable to further differentiate them 
into stages of progress. 

1. The first year man has a bewildered look and a 
new white coat, complete with illegibly penciled notes 
protruding in a completely disorganized fashion from 
cither side pocket. The upper left ham! pocket is in- 
variably resplendent with a new pen and pencil set 
(usually a graduation gift), Norma pencil and a ruler. 
Neckties may or may not be present. Some knowledge 
of the first year curriculum and a keen sense of olfac- 
tion are invaluable as a diagnostic aid. 

2. Little more than the drooping eyelids and waxen 
pallor of the second year man is necessary in this dif- 
ferential. The microscope, path slides and a badly 
needed shave complete the syndrome. A grossly new 
and carelessly dangling stethoscope plus the little blue 
pamphlet containing the latest national board questions 
are practically pathognomonic of the fact that a third 
year man is in the making. 

3. The aging stethoscope and the shiny black "pearl" 
book of the third year student give him the look of a 
skilled clinician. This equipment is neatly tucked into 
the pockets of his under-sized white coat, whose torn 
and tattered neck and sleeves serve as the "hash marks" 
of medical service. His present level of specialization 
is easily discernible by a visual inventory of his upper 
left hand pocket, which will invariably contain a re- 
flex hammer, tuning fork, flashlight, and ophthalmo- 
scope. 

4. Additional, more subtle changes delineate the 
fourth year man from all others. His indifferent air 
of superiority and a leisurely pace mark him as the 
physician of tomorrow. His clinic appointments are 
scheduled late and his hour of departure, early. Those 
khaki pants and loafers have long since been replaced 
by pin-striped suits and well sinned shoes. The tailored 
vest, the thick, well worn "pearl" book, and ancient 
stethoscope serve to differentiate him from all others. 
On occasion he may appear slightly worried during the 
early Spring, but once internship announcements have 
been made, he again settles back to reassume his role 
of the casual clinician. 



THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 



June 1, 1952 





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Over 250 Titles 

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MEDICAL 
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Vol. \ cc. No. WA 3-2500 



ADVERTISING SECTION 



105 



Weekly Clinicopathological Exercises 

Case Diseussor: PR. HERBERT MAGRAM 
Pathologist: DR. JOHN ULTMANN 

T. S. admitted Jan. 2, L950; died Feb. 27, 1950. 

X-ray No. 1952 
I'nit No. 1 
Autopsy No. 1492 

The first PH admission of this 2S yr old female bookie 
after an unsuccessful course at Arthur Murray, with a CC of 
feeling of fullness in epigastrium noted after New Year's 
dinner. 

PH: Trauma to first metatarsal in 1936 associated with 
misplaced mousetrap. Patient ate live gold fish with friends 
from Harvard in 193S, has since noted thin pulsating neck 
slits bilaterally. Worked as a pickle-pusher during the war 
(as the jars of pickles came down the assembly line to the 
capping machine, one pickle always stuck up; she pushed it 
down), but pt. quit after noting persistence of a green tinge 
on right thumb. For the past 7 months, pt. has noted "girdle 
stretch,'' episodes of morning vomiting and abnormal food 
cravings. 

P. I.: On New Year's Eve after a big dinner, pt. had a 
feeling of malaise and epigastric fullness. Pt.'s younger 
brother, a 2nd yr P&S student, gave her sulfa, penicillin IM 
and antihistamines, but upon noting that she still had a 
Rl'Q after 2 hours, advised hospitalization. 

P.E.: T 98.6, P 80, R 14, BP 1.5. Physical examination 
revealed a well-developed and very well nourished female 
in no acute distress, but belching a great deal, flatulent, and 
with some pain over the site of a puncture wound in the left 
buttock. Skin smooth, eyes blue, hair ala Veronica, and a 
wink that unnerved two internes. No GGE, heart and lungs 
negative, Substantia Nigra not palpable. Abdomen: A lg. 
freely moving midline tumor with "a beat to it" was ob- 
served. No fluid or permanent waves. Neuro: Accentuated 
oculoanal and wink reflexes. Pork & Beans signs were absent. 

Lab Data: Wasserman and rvlein at variance, Mazzini on 
fence. Blood: No RBCs found on thick and thin smears. 
Trine AZ negative, positive for Benjamin Jones, teensy- 
weensy crystals of unknown origin, and 10-12 noodles/hpf 
(some clumped). Hot and cold running stools serutan posi- 
tive, but negative for tomato sauce (Heinz test) . ECG: 
Wadsworth 6-7200 — ask for Margie. First lead suggestive, 
second lead promising, and third lead still under intensive 
investigation. Since the presence of a Rl'Q mass was clini- 
cally ascertained, no liver tests were done. 

Course: Pt. was placed on ACTH to delay wound healing 
until an accurate Dx could be made. Patient ran a peculiar 
oscillating fever until bed was moved farther away from 
radiators. There was a short period of euphoria on 2/22 
co- incident with arrival of mail from pt.'s husband (an 
entomologist studying the sexual behavior of the male tsetse 
fly at Wana Hadi). On 2/24 patient registered subjective 
improvement after a saline purge. 120 laboratory technicians 
were asked to report thereon, and Strombolt eggs were found. 
By February 25th the heating in her now very much enlarged 
abdomen was very audible, and an exploratory laporatomy 
was advised. This was done, and a larpe, percussible, pul- 
sating mass with 2 legs was removed. Immediately post-op 
the pt. sat up in bed, shouted, "My time has come," and 
expired. 



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ATTENTION 3rd YEAR CLASS 

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Read what Dr. Loeb, Broadway Internist, says: 

"There is an ocean of Pearl in this Great Book 
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one." 

MURKY MANUAL, Inc. 



106 THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE June 1, 1952 



THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 
Presents Today's Medicine for Tomorrow's Use 



Publishes the combined Staff Conference from 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons; also 
sixteen other Staff Conferences each year; 
the reports of three Research Societies; 
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Editor: Alexander B. Gutman, M.D., New York 

Advisory Board Student Subscription (U. S. A.) — $10 yearly 

David P. Barr, M.D., New York 

Arthur L. Bloomfield, M.D., San Francisco Regular Subscription (U. S. A.) — $12 yearly 

Eugene A. Stead, Jr., M.D., Durham 

Joseph T. Wearn, M.D., Cleveland 

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Vol. 1 iv. No. WA 5-2500 



AIIYIRTISIM. SFC'TION 



107 



F.B.I. Invades Med. Center 

Rilliam Weed, day time Columbia University Medical Stu- 
dent, and night time FBI agent, rested today alter the most 
harrowing of all his many one man invasions of the leftist 
lairs. 

Weed, a "member" of many subversive organizations for 
the purpose of obtaining information useful to the FBI, last 
evening found himself on the opposite side of the law for 
several frustrating hours. The night time Hoover aide was 
attending a meeting, under one of his many aliases, of the 
"Society for Jacking Up the Intern's Stipend," listed as sub- 
versive by the magazine '"Red Flannels." Weed aroused sus- 
picion at the meeting by forgetting himself momentarily and 
voting "no" to the motion "should we shoot Bob Taft." The 
young sleuth quickly took leave of the meeting when he was 
asked to "get going" by two ruffians in the group. 

Suspicious of being followed. Weed hastened quickly down 
the dark streets for the nearest subway. Observing an officer 
of the law, the young medical student paused briefly to tell 
"the city's finest" that he thought he was being pursued and 
to please head off the two ruffians while he proceeded on his 
way. The officer, somehow not knowing Weed's real identity 
and leery of becoming involved in what might be the city's 
latest unsolved East Side jewel robbery, decided that the 
smartest move was to arrest young Weed. The medical stu- 
dent unwisely attempted to pull his rank. At 67th Street 
Precinct Headquarters, Sgt. Murphy became convinced after 
Weed's third screaming demand that he be allowed to call 
J. Edgar Hoover, that the case was one for Bellevue. After 
spending the night at this institution, Weed's identity was 
confirmed to the embarrassment of all. 

In an address today to the Young Women's "No Graft — 
Elect Taft" meeting, Weed added Bellevue and Sgt. Murphj 
to the growing list of subversives in the country. 



Compliments of 

CARLSON AND SMITH 

Yearbook Specialists 



Attention Medical 


Students! 


ONLY FEW COPIES 


LEFT!! 


Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics" 


PRINTED 1941 




Don't wait for new 


edition 


IT MAY NEVER COME 


GOODMAN AND 

Rare Book Dea 


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108 



THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 



June 1, 1952 



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Vol. 5 cc. No. VVA 3-2500 



ADVERTISING SECTION 



109 



Compliments 
of 

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Linen Service to Bard Hall 



Compliments 



of 



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Dairy Products for Bard Hall 



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THE PRETTY SHARP JOURNAL OF MEDICINE 



June 1, 1952 




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^ 



of you and your classmates upon your school life achieve 
immortality in a carefully planned and executed yearbook. 

From the arid desert of Arizona, and the sultry green island 
of Puerto Rico, to the snow-blanketed slopes of Northern 
New England, we have traveled, happy and proud to have 
been an instrument in the translating into print, the humor 
pathos, excitement, and sentiment found in the campus 
• life of over seventy-five colleges and preparatory schools. 

As former members of yearbook staffs in our school days, 

we bring into our professional duties a real understanding 

of the many proems confronting each yearbook editor. 




Jsntemshw ^rppointmentd 



ip ~swppt 



CLASS OF 1952 



Aboody, Albert M. 
Abruzzi, William A., Jr. 
Alenick, Monroe E, 
Allen, George W. 
Angenent, Winifred J. 
Armstrong, Jeanne E. 
Arroyo, Pedro, Jr. 
Avery, Wilbur G. 
Baker, Jean 
Barlow, Joseph J. 
Bcnninghoff, David L. 
Beres, Paul 
Bivings, Frank G. 
Bozer, John M. 
Bragg, Robert L. 
Brandon, Leonard H., 
Carlson, Robert E. 
Chanin, Ellen N. 
Chase, William J. 
Clarkson, Bayard D. 
Cowles, John D. 
Cox, Denton S. 
Crounse, Kenneth L. 
Curran, Francis J. 
DeGroot, Leslie 
Dettinger, Garth B. 
Doolittle, Charles L. 
Ellsworth, Robert M. 
Epstein, Wallace 
Evans, Minton B. 
Evans, Robert A. 
Fcldman, Robert 
Fink, Sidney 
Fish, Winthrop 
Flowers, Robert M. 
Garcelon, William S. 
Gedney, Judith 
Gent, Donald H. 
Gersl, Paul H. 
Gilbert, Paul L. 
Greene, Murray A. 
Haelig, Arthur W. 
Hall, Arthur P. 
Halpryn, Hillard J. 
Hamilton, Thomas M. 
Haynes, Herbert C. 
Heffernan, John F., Jr 
Hegeman, John S. 
Herbert, Victor D. 
Hoch, Samuel L. 
Holub, Donald A. 



Grace New Haven Community Hospital 

Public Health Service 

Mount Sinai Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Philadelphia General Hospital 

Montefiore Hospital 

Public Health Service 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Montefiore Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

U. of Chicago Clinics 

Barnes Hospital 

Buffalo General Hospital 

Public Health Service 

Jr. Hartford Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

City of Detroit Receiving Hospital 

White Plains Hospital Association 

The New York Hospital 

Alameda County Hospitals 

The New York Hospital 

Lenox Hill Hospital 

Army Medical Service Hospitals 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

U. S. Air Force Medical Service 

Los Angeles County Harbor General 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Kings County Hospital 

San Francisco Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

Moimonides Hospital, Brooklyn 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Methodist Hospital 

The Roosevelt Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 

The Robert Packer Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

Maimonides Hospital of Brooklyn 

Barnes Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

The Roosevelt Hospital 

The U. of Virginia Hospital 

St. Elizabeth's Hospital 

Philadelphia General Hospital 

Mary Imogene Bossett Hospital 

Army Medical Service Hospitals 

Bellevue Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 



Hosmer, John A. 
Hummel, Rufus J., Jr. 
Jacob, James A., Jr. 
Kane, Rosamond 
Kassriel, Robert S. 
Kaufman, Richard J. 
Key, Marcus M. ( Jr, 
Kornfeld, Peter 
Lobach, Katherine S. 
Louria, Henry W., Jr. 
Macholdt, Arno W. 
Mackay, Betty L. 
Magram, Herbert M. 
Margalius Alvin, Jr. 
McCaslin, Hugh T. 
O'Loughlin, John C. 
Orr, Jack T. 
Orvis, Harold H., Jr. 
Payson, Henry E. 
Pollin, William 
Prinsell, Gustave, G.C. 
Proctor, Munro H. 
Roduazo, Rocco 
Reed, William B. 
Reiner, Ernest A. 
Reynolds, Jack 
Roosen, Willem W. 
Rousseau, Robert E. 
Scaglione, Peter R. 
Schneider, Stanley H. 
Shepard, Frank P., Jr. 
Shiller, Jack G. 
Shipp, Joseph C. 
Siek, Hilmer G., Jr. 
Silbert, Robert 
Sjoberg, Douglas S. 
Smith, Anthony J. 
Smith, James W. 
Speicher, M. E. 
Succhting, Ralph L. 
Todd, Willis D. 
Ullmann, John E. 
Van Home, Robert G. 
Waller, William C. 
Wheliss, John A. 
White, Joseph P. 
White, Leland M. 
Wikler, Norman S. 
Wildcrman, Robert J. 
Wolff, Marianne 
Wymon, David S. 



Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital 

Public Health Service 

St. Luke's Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

U. of Chicago Clinics 

Grace New Haven Community Hospital 

Public Health Service 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

Cincinnati General Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

The Roosevelt Hospital 

Kings County Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

University Hospitals of Cleveland 

Cincinnati General Hospital 

University Hospital of Michigan 

Bellevue Hospital 

Gallinger Municipal Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

Saginaw General Hospital 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital 

The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

U. of Minnesota Hospital 

St. Luke's Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

Army Medical Service Hospitals 

Bellevue Hospital 

Barnes Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Hartford Hospital 

The Mount Sinai Hospital 

Strong Memorial Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

The Roosevelt Hospital 

The St. Vincent's Hospital 

U. of Minnesota Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

The New York Hospital 

Philadelphia General Hospital 

The Roosevelt Hospital 

Charlotte Memorial Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Methodist Hospital 

Bellevue Hospital 

The Presbyterion Hospital 

The Presbyterian Hospital 

Strong Memorial Hospital 



Hill, John 



Ass't Prof. Pharmacology, Univ. of North Carolina 



In 


M 


;mor!am 


ELIHU 


o. 


SILVERMAN 


March 


3, 1952 




COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0064277836